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Judging by the number of folks charged with driving under influence I am guessing the penalty is rather light. Of...

Winter heating raises fire risks

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According to the National Fire Protection Association, working smoke alarms save lives and cut the risk of dying in a fire in half. Officials said that smoke alarms be installed, tested and maintained in every home.

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The Daily Reflector

Thursday, January 10, 2019

RALEIGH — After one of the deadliest years on record for fire fatalities in North Carolina, Insurance Commissioner and State Fire Marshal Mike Causey urges residents to stay focused on fire safety and prevention in 2019.

In 2018, 133 people lost their lives in North Carolina because of fire — 50 more people from the year before. In most of these fires, a working smoke alarm was not present.

“The risk of death due to fire can be diminished with the proper use of smoke alarms,” Causey said. “It shouldn’t take tragedies like the recent deaths in Charlotte to remind us of the importance of working smoke alarms and a home fire escape plan.”

To reduce the number of fire fatalities in 2019, Causey will be leading a statewide effort to provide more education on heating fires, oxygen related fires, and the leading cause of house fires: cooking. OSFM will also be asking state legislators for additional funding to implement more community risk reduction programs and to hire more fire investigators to assist local fire departments.

In more than 40 percent of the fire fatalities (54) in 2018, investigators were not able to determine a cause due to a lack of evidence. However, investigators believe the majority of those fires were caused by heating sources inside the home.

Each year during December, January, and February, there is an increase in the number of home fires related to heating. According to the National Fire Protection Association, heating is the second leading cause of home fires, deaths and injuries in the U.S.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, working smoke alarms save lives and cut the risk of dying in a fire in half. Causey said that smoke alarms be installed, tested and maintained in every home.

Causey recommends the following advice related to smoke alarms:

■ Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each separate sleeping room, and on every level of the home, including the basement.

■ An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, a combination of alarms or dual-sensor alarms are recommended.

■ To keep smoke alarms working well, follow the manufacturer’s instructions in the package or online for cleaning.

■ Make sure everyone in your home understands the warning of the smoke alarm and knows how to respond.

■ Smoke alarms with non-replaceable batteries (long-life) batteries are designed to remain effective for up to 10 years. Replace smoke alarms when they are 10 years old. If the alarm chirps warning that the battery is low, replace the entire unit right away.

Causey provided the following advice regarding home escape plans:

■ Draw a map of each level of the home, showing all doors and windows, and discuss the plan with everyone in your household, including visitors.

■ Practice your home fire escape drill twice a year with everyone in your home. Practice using different ways out. Practice what to do in case there is smoke (get low and go and get out fast).

■ Establish a permanent outside meeting place (such as a tree, light pole or mailbox) that is a safe distance from your home.

■ After you’ve practiced your home escape drill, evaluate it and discuss what worked and what could be improved.

■ When a smoke alarm sounds, get out fast. You may have only seconds to escape.

* If there is smoke blocking the exit, use your second way out. Before opening a door, feel the door and its knob. If either is hot, leave the door closed and use your second way out. If there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.

■ Get out and stay out. Go to your established meeting place. Never go back for people, pets or things. If you can’t get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 911 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.

■ If you can’t get out, close the door and cover the vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out. Call 911, tell the emergency operator where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.

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Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

Crime and Rescue

April 18, 2019

A door was forcibly broken down to gain entry to a home during an armed robbery reported on Tuesday, according to a case report released by the Greenville Police Department.

The incident took place about 4 a.m. on April 16 on the 500 block of Spring Forest Road.

The door of the home sustained $300…

April 17, 2019

Nearly $600 in Nintendo merchandise was stolen during a home break-in reported on Monday, according to a case report released by the Greenville Police Department.

The incident took place between 10 a.m. on March 1 and 3 p.m. on April 14 on the 600 block of Cotanche Street.

The home was entered…

April 16, 2019

Two men wanted in connection to a home invasion and shooting that injured two people last month have been arrested, Greenville police said.  

Lydell Maurice Carter, Jr.,18,  of 502 N. Maple St. Ahoskie, and Iwanniza Love, 17, of 103 Ford St., Greenville each are charged with two…

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April 16, 2019

When calling for help in an emergency, most people’s first contact is not with a police officer or firefighter. That calm, reassuring voice on the line is that of a telecommunicator.

National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week runs through Saturday and Pitt County Emergency Management…

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April 15, 2019

Connecting former criminals with affordable housing and job opportunities is one way to keep them from winding up back in jail, officials said during a police relations committee meeting last week.

Greenville Police officer Lt. K.Z. Thomas said during Tuesday’s meeting that she sees a lot of…

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April 14, 2019

Pitt County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested a man following an investigation that tied him to several recent break-ins, including an attempt at the Hustle Mart in Farmville.  

According to a news release issued Sunday morning, deputies arrested Hiakeem J’Von Powell…

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April 14, 2019

A car crash in South Carolina on Friday killed two East Carolina University students along with the driver of another car and seriously injured two more students, officials said Saturday.

Shea Crothers, 22, of 17 Avenue F, Charlotte, and James Edwin Stanley, 18, of 533 Oyster Rock Lane, Sneads…

April 14, 2019

NEW BERN — A man connected to an eastern North Carolina street gang is going to serve at least seven years in federal prison for his role in a drug conspiracy from 2012 to the summer of 2017.

Markell Wiggins, 33, of Scotland Neck, was sentenced to 86 months Wednesday in New Bern by U.S.…

April 14, 2019

A Goldsboro man charged with driving while impaired had a blood alcohol level more than three times over the legal limit, according to Pitt County court records.  

John Earl Murchinson III, 28, of 308 N. Kornegay St., Goldsboro, was stopped at 9 p.m. on April 4 near East 14th Street by…

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April 13, 2019

A car crash in South Carolina on Friday killed two East Carolina University students along with the driver of another car and seriously injured two more students, officials said Saturday.

Shea Crothers, 22, of 17 Avenue F, Charlotte, and James Edwin Stanley, 18, of 533 Oyster Rock Lane, Sneads…

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