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Judging by the number of folks charged with driving under influence I am guessing the penalty is rather light. Of...

Twitter tantrum against Sessions bares contempt

Trump Sessions

President Donald Trump, left, sits with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during the FBI National Academy graduation ceremony in Quantico, Virginia, in December.

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Tuesday, September 11, 2018

By now, few might lift an eyebrow at President Trump’s crusade to delegitimize his own Justice Department and, specifically, his attorney general, Jeff Sessions. It long ago became clear that Trump regards federal law enforcement — as he sees all of government — as a political tool to advance the interests of himself and of his party (assuming those interests align, of course; if not, the party is on its own).

Yet even by that debased standard, Trump’s Twitter tantrum on Sept. 3 against Sessions set a new low, providing a kind of anti-civics lesson for the nation he’s supposed to lead.

“Two long-running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department,” he wrote. “Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff.”

With this latest outburst, the president has again laid bare his contempt for the rule of law. Trump does not even pretend to care about the allegations of corruption against the two lawmakers in question. His concern is only that they are “very popular” members who would have scored “easy wins” in November, if only Sessions had kept his fat mouth shut until after the midterms — or better yet, buried the allegations permanently.

Chris Collins, Republican of New York, who was indicted last month on insider trading charges, is facing multiple counts of securities fraud, wire fraud and lying to federal agents. Investigators were aided in their efforts by the fact that the representative’s alleged misbehavior was caught on video while he was attending the White House congressional picnic last summer.

Duncan Hunter, Republican of California, indicted just a couple of weeks after Collins, is accused of misappropriating $250,000 in campaign funds for personal use. He and his wife, also named in the 47-page indictment, allegedly dipped into the political kitty to buy items ranging from running shoes to family vacations to plane tickets for their pet.

Both lawmakers have pleaded not guilty. Collins has suspended his campaign, while Hunter’s name will remain on the ballot and he has a strong chance to win re-election against an inexperienced Democratic challenger.

These indictments carry a personal resonance for the president. Collins was the first member of Congress to endorse Trump’s candidacy. Hunter was the second. For a president for whom blind loyalty matters above all, the possibility of losing two such devoted followers must be especially vexing.

The heart of the matter for Trump is, as always, what’s in it for Trump. Keeping Congress under Republican control is key to the president’s fortunes, both political and legal. As Trump sees it, Sessions has once more put everything at risk with his traitorous insistence upon upholding the law.

Indeed, Trump continues to make clear that if only he had known then what he knows now — especially as regards the Russia investigation — Sessions would never have been offered the job.

Trump’s beef is not with Jeff Sessions or the Justice Department. He has a problem with the law — or at least with the idea that it should apply to him and those who do his bidding. Republicans, especially Republican lawmakers, are by their silence complicit in this perversion of justice.

The New York Times

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Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

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