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Why do the citizens of Greenville want to give yet another outside firm millions of dollars for the red light camera's....

Reconsider exotic animal ban

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Given the overwhelming workload of any conscientious animal control officer — and it's clear that Tim Langley is that — having to contend with the challenging husbandry and welfare concerns that exotic animals bring to the area is one responsibility that can and should be eliminated.

It’s wonderful that Mr. Langley takes his duties with the seriousness they deserve, but even the most vigilant welfare check when a circus comes to town cannot negate the inherent cruelty of hauling animals around the country in cramped, hot, smelly trucks and forcing them to perform under the treat of a whip or bullhook. Wild animals are trained to do tricks by sheer force and domination.

When not in front of an audience, elephants spend their lives on short chains. Tigers languish in cages so small they can barely take a step or two. Life on the road is no life at all.

Some years ago, PETA did reach out to animal control agencies across the country with guidance about what to look for when circuses came to their town with wild animals. But today, the move is to stop cruelty at the city limit. From New York City to San Francisco, and tons of points in-between, forward-thinking municipalities are saying “no” to exotic animal displays.

Greenville councilors should not table this proposal, but instead revisit it with the bigger picture in mind.

Jennifer O'Connor

The PETA Foundation

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