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What grows together goes together — in a fruit crisp

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Rhubarb Boysenberry Crisp

LyndaBalslev
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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

There's no better way to enjoy ripe fruit than in a good old-fashioned crisp. In the summer, stone fruit and berries reign supreme, while in the fall, apples and pears take over. This crisp was inspired by late spring's fresh rhubarb and boysenberries. I spied them at my weekend farmers market.

A little rickety garden table in the far corner of the maze of stalls was lined with blotchy pint-sized cartons, stained blue and violet, from the juices of wild raspberries, blueberries and (best of all) boysenberries.

Boysenberries peak in a relatively short window from late spring to early summer here in California. They resemble a floppy cone-shaped blackberry, and taste like a tart cross between a blackberry and raspberry. Next to the berries was a wicker basket filled with dainty upright new rhubarb stalks awash in green and pink. The colorful messages were clear: Come and get us. And so I did.

I made this dessert for our dinner guests that night, one of whom is gluten-free. The topping was crisp, nutty and sweet, faintly spiced with cinnamon. It was delicious for gluten-free and gluten-lovers alike, and a perfect embellishment to my farmers market find. If you don't have access to boysenberries, feel free to substitute blackberries or raspberries.

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Rhubarb Boysenberry Crisp

Active Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: about 1 hour, plus cooling time

Yield: Serves 6

Topping:

3/4 cup almond meal

3/4 cup rolled oats (gluten-free or regular)

1/2 cup walnuts

1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon salt

3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled

Filling:

1 1/2 pounds rhubarb, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 4 cups)

2 cups boysenberries

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 tablespoon cornstarch

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Combine all of the topping ingredients, except the butter, in the bowl of a food processor and pulse to coarsely chop the walnuts. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal.

Place the rhubarb and half of the boysenberries in a bowl. Sprinkle the sugar over and gently mix to combine. Whisk the lemon juice and cornstarch in a small bowl. Pour over the fruit, add the zest, and gently stir to coat. Spread the fruit in an 8-by-8-inch (or similar size) baking dish, or, alternatively, divide the fruit between individual gratin dishes. Arrange the remaining boysenberries over the top of the fruit, and then evenly spread the topping over the fruit.

Bake in the oven until the topping is golden brown, the rhubarb is soft, and the juices are bubbling, about 45 minutes. If the topping browns before the filling is fully cooked, then loosely cover with foil to prevent burning. Remove and cool. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

** ** **

Lynda Balslev is an award-winning cookbook author, recipe developer, tester and editor. Taste Food is distributed by Andrews McMeel Syndication.

 

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