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Loans help candidates fund campaigns

021217Murphy
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Greg Murphy

Allen Thomas.jpg
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By Conner Patchkofsky
The Daily Reflector

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Federal election data show that a current member of the N.C. House of Representatives and the former mayor of Greenville raised the most money in the campaign for the 3rd Congressional District, with help from personal loans.

State Rep. Greg Murphy, a Greenville physician, and Allen Thomas, the former mayor and director of the state Global TransPark, reported total fundraising amounts of $317,994 and $255,390, respectively, during the first candidate filing quarter, according to a review of Federal Election Commission data. Thomas boosted his total by loaning $200,000 to his campaign, the data showed.

Murphy is among 17 Republicans vying for the nomination in the primary election taking place today. Thomas is among six Democrats. Two Libertarian candidates also are seeking the nomination of their party.

Of the $317,994 in total funds raised by the Murphy campaign, $50,000 came from a loan made by the candidate. His campaign reported 190 itemized donations, or donations over $200. Of those 190 donors, 50 gave at least $2,500 — close to the $2,800 maximum that can be donated per election cycle.

The remaining 140 itemized donors gave less than $2,500 in single donations. Murphy reported $240,455 in total itemized donations and $11,539 raised from small-dollar donors, or donors giving less than $200. He also reported $16,000 raised from eight other entities, such as political action committees.

Murphy’s campaign raised $251,994 in total individual contributions. The vast majority of money raised by his campaign came from in-state, at nearly $230,855. He raised close to $10,000 from from donors in Virginia, California, Florida and Georgia.

Murphy’s campaign spent $204,435.02 in the first quarter, leaving the campaign with a cash-on-hand total of $113,558.98 and a $50,000 debt. A large portion of the Murphy campaign’s expenditures went towards media buys, such as online or television advertising.

Thomas’ campaign reported $44,807.10 in itemized contributions during the first quarter and received six contributions over $2,500. He also reported $7,583 in small-dollar donations. Thomas received $1,000 from a PAC in his own name, and $2,000 from a PAC registered under the name of G.K. Butterfield, the 1st District U.S. House Representative.

In total, Thomas raised $52,390.10 from individual donations in the first quarter. His campaign reported $116,489.63 in expenditures during the first quarter, leaving the campaign with a cash-on-hand total of $138,900.47 and $200,000 in debt.

A large portion of the campaign’s expenditures went toward direct mail, spending about $47,000 on mailers.

Also raising large amounts in the Republican primary were candidates Joan Perry and Eric Rouse.

Perry’s campaign reported total fundraising of $154,345, which included a $30,000 loan to the campaign by the candidate. She raised $3,000 from other entities. Her campaign reported expenditures in the first period totaling $75,408.60, leaving her with $78,936.40 cash-on-hand and $30,000 in debt.

Rouse reported total fundraising of $147,640, with $101,740 of that coming from a loan to the campaign by the candidate. Expenditures totaled $86,794.36, leaving the Rouse campaign with a cash-on-hand amount of $60,845.64 and $101,740 in debt.

Another high fundraiser in the Democratic primary was Marine veteran Richard Bew, who reported $124,513.34 in total money raised during the first quarter. His campaign totaled $109,713.34 in individual contributions, with $36,045.34 of that coming from small-dollar donors. Bew also self-funded $11,300 and raised $2,500 from a PAC called “VoteVets.” His campaign received a $1,000 donation from a PAC registered under Amy McGrath, an unsuccessful nominee for Congress in Kentucky last cycle.

Bew outraised Thomas by more than a two-to-one margin in individual contributions, but his total fell short when accounting for Thomas’s $200,000 loan to his campaign.

The following is a full list of each primary candidates’ FEC-reported total fundraising haul during the first quarter:

GOP:

■ Greg Murphy: $317,994, with a $50,000 loan from the candidate and $16,000 from other entities*

■ Joan Perry: $154,345, with a $30,000 loan from the candidate, a $1,740 check from the candidate and $3,500 from other entities*

■ Eric Rouse: $147,640, with a $101,740 loan from the candidate*

■ Francis de Luca: $119,410.89, with a $75,000 loan from the candidate*

■ Chimer Clark: $111,520, with an $80,000 loan from the candidate and a $29,000 check from the candidate*

■ Jeff Moore: $104,781.40, with an $8,400 check from the candidate*

■ Celeste Cairns: $75,099.50, with $7,800 from other entities*

■ Phillip Shephard: $70,500, with a $4,000 check from the candidate*

■ Samuel Boyd: $48,592.09, with a $1,867.09 check from the candidate and $5,750 from other entities* 

■ Michele Nix: $48,203.50, with no outside money or self-financing

■ Philip Law: $26,480, with a $260 check from the candidate and $100 from other entities*

■ Michael Speciale: $15,670.11, with no outside money or self-financing

■ Donald Cox: $8,988, with a $4,075 check from the candidate*

■ Kevin Baiko: $4,750, with a $4,500 loan from the candidate*

■ Michael Tabor: No fundraising data was reported

Democrats:

■ Allen Thomas: $255,390.10, with a $200,000 loan from the candidate and $3,000 from other entities* 

■ Richard Bew: $124,513.34, with an $11,300 check from the candidate and $3,500 from other entities*

■ Dana Outlaw: $18,353.66, with a $10,800 check from the candidate*

■ Ike Johnson: $16,229.52, with a $4,085.34 loan from the candidate and a $270 check from the candidate*

■ Gregory Humphrey: No fundraising data was reported

■ Ernest Reeves: No fundraising data was reported

*A check from the candidate means the candidate donated money to their campaign out of pocket. A loan from the candidate means the campaign is in debt to the candidate. Other entities include outside donors such as PACs and Super PACs, not individual donors.

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