Loading...
http://super-sound.shopcool.ru АБСОЛЮТНО БЕСПРОВОДНЫЕ BLUETOOTH НАУШНИКИ (АНАЛОГ AIRBEATS) Беспроводные наушники с...

Trump deserves more latitude and less attitude

MarcThiessen

Marc Thiessen

Loading…

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Well, that didn't take long. President Trump had barely departed Singapore when Democrats in Washington unleashed scathing attacks over his meeting with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

"What the United States has gained is vague and unverifiable at best. What North Korea has gained, however, is tangible and lasting," Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., fumed. "In his haste to reach an agreement, President Trump elevated North Korea to the level of the United States while preserving the regime's status quo," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., protested.

Please. Where were these complaints when President Barack Obama was enjoying peanuts and Cracker Jack with Raul Castro at a Havana ballpark? And a few months ago, Schumer was decrying Trump's "reckless" military threats and Pelosi was complaining about his "saber-rattling." Now, suddenly, Trump's gone from warmonger to the second coming of Neville Chamberlain?

The criticism is premature and overwrought. Trump made no real concessions in Singapore. All the president did was, as a goodwill gesture, suspend military exercises with South Korea — a decision he can easily reverse.

And the fact that the statement the two leaders signed referred only to "complete denuclearization," not "complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization," does not mean that Trump gave up verification or irreversibility in the deal, because there is no "deal" yet, only a "communique" that summarized what the two leaders discussed. We are at the start of the negotiating process, not the end.

Trump inherited this mess. Every other approach by his predecessors has failed. So, the president and his team are trying something new; they deserve some latitude to see if this new approach can succeed.

Will it work? Maybe not. The North Koreans are skilled liars. It will be incredibly difficult to reach a good deal that ensures the complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization of North Korea.

But there is reason for hope Trump will not sign a bad deal. That's because the president set a very high bar for himself when he withdrew from Obama's nuclear deal with Iran. Any agreement with North Korea that he and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo reach can't replicate the flaws they identified in the Iran deal.

What were those flaws? The administration has identified five principal defects:

1. Weak verification. As Trump declared in his May speech on the Iran nuclear agreement, "the deal's inspection provisions lack adequate mechanisms to prevent, detect, and punish cheating, and don't even have the unqualified right to inspect many important locations, including military facilities."

2. No restrictions on ballistic missiles. The Iran deal "fails to address the regime's development of ballistic missiles that could deliver nuclear warheads," the president said.

3. No nuclear dismantlement. "The deal doesn't even require Iran to dismantle its military nuclear capability," Trump said in a 2016 address to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

4. Front-loaded sanctions relief. "The deal lifted crippling economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for very weak limits on the regime's nuclear activity, and no limits at all on its other malign behavior," Trump declared in May.

5. No congressional buy-in. During the congressional debate over the Iran deal, Pompeo complained that "instead of coming to Congress for approval of an Iranian deal, the President needs only to convince a handful of Democrats to not override a presidential veto."

A nuclear deal with North Korea must not replicate these flaws. According to Pompeo, it will not. "There will be in-depth verification" of the North's compliance, the secretary said this week. The United States, he said, has assembled a team of more than 100 experts who will be charged with the task of "dismantling North Korea's weapons programs."

Any agreement will cover North Korea's chemical and biological weapons program and missiles that threaten the world, Pompeo said. And he assured that "until such time as we get the outcome that we're demanding, economic relief is not going to be provided." Finally, Pompeo declared, "in contrast to the previous administration, we want to include Congress as a partner in this process. We want our efforts to have broad support with the American people and endure beyond the Trump administration. A treaty would be our preferred way to go."

That is an incredibly high standard that will be very tough to meet. "This administration will not repeat the mistakes of the past," Pompeo promised, adding that "a bad deal is not an option." We know what a bad deal looks like. We should all be pulling for Trump and Pompeo to negotiate a good one.

Marc Thiessen is an author, columnist and political commentator. He served as a speechwriter for President George W. Bush and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.

Loading…

Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

Op Ed

September 20, 2018

On Sept. 17, Politico reported, U.S. president Donald Trump partially declassified a government surveillance application targeting former campaign consultant Carter Page and directed the U.S. Department of Justice to publicly release text messages relating to the "Russiagate" probe between former…

Knapp

September 20, 2018

In his new book "Fear," Bob Woodward recounts that in April 2017, after President Trump saw images of dead Syrian children with their mouths foaming from a sarin attack, he called Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and issued an order: Get me a plan for a military strike to take out Syrian President…

MarcThiessen

September 19, 2018

Three days before the Washington-based trial against Paul Manafort was set to begin, special counsel Robert Mueller raised eyebrows in the legal community when his office filed a new charging document. Many began to wonder whether an announcement about a plea agreement with Manafort, President…

 Deanna Paul

September 19, 2018

So much of our reasoning about race is both emotional and faulty. In ordinary, as well as professional, conversation, we use terms such as discrimination, prejudice, racial preferences and racism interchangeably, as if they referred to the same behavior. We can avoid many pitfalls of misguided…

Walter Williams

September 18, 2018

Since 1999’s Floyd, we’ve come to the conclusion that with hurricanes, water is the new wind.

Smarter construction methods — from beefed-up building codes to plain old common sense — seem to have helped mitigate damage solely from wind and, to a lesser extent, storm surge.…

September 18, 2018

Readers of the Los Angeles Times were furious in 2003 when — only five days before the California gubernatorial election — the paper published a stunning investigation in which 16 women accused candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger of groping them.

They canceled their subscriptions in droves…

Margaret Sullivan

September 18, 2018

If recent history is any guide, we'll still be hearing about the Hurricane Florence recovery effort well into 2020.

The recovery from Hurricane Matthew — which flooded large parts of Eastern North Carolina in October 2016 — was still creeping along as Florence hit the state. Just a week…

Colin Campbell

September 17, 2018

The Washington Post

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday promising to punish anyone attempting to meddle in U.S. elections, including with "measures that could be capable of devastating an interfering country's economy," according to an administration description. For a…

September 17, 2018

Over the past year, the movement to ban plastic straws has seen tremendous success. Major companies including Starbucks have decided to eliminate them in their stores, and some metropolitan areas have passed citywide bans. This consumer and environmental trend has been an encouraging example of…

John Podesta

September 17, 2018

When natural disasters or other emergencies hit our state, North Carolinians respond in droves — and I’m not just referring to the crucial and praiseworthy work of our public employees who work in emergency management, public safety, and public works.

North Carolinians respond in many…

john hood.jpg
295 stories in Op Ed. Viewing 1 through 10.
«First Page   «Previous Page        
Page 1 of 30
        Next Page»   Last Page»