Loading...
BYH Zoning Commission. Take your chairs and sit in the field by Bostic Sugg in morning or afternoon and tell the...

President should remain tough on Russia at summit

Germany Russia US

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the G-20 Summit in Hamburg in 2017.

Loading…

Monday, July 9, 2018

Unlike his Singapore one-on-one with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, President Donald Trump’s summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, slated for July 16 in Helsinki, doesn’t suggest history in the making. Trump and Putin have already met — twice. Russian and American leaders have been meeting for decades. By contrast, no U.S. president ever had met a North Korean leader.

Yet a sense of suspense hangs over the Trump-Putin summit. Or is it dread?

There’s always merit to meeting with world leaders, even leaders of nations with hostile agendas. Common ground can be reached. Foundations for better relations can be forged. But as both countries’ governments have anticipated a meeting, Trump has been hinting at concessions that ignore the Kremlin’s track record for undermining American interests — abroad and on U.S. soil.

The Trump administration has floated the idea of creating a way for Russia to rejoin the Group of Seven, the club of industrialized democracies that kicked the Kremlin out after Russia pilfered Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. The G-7 — G-8 when Russia belonged — tackles world problems ranging from terrorism to global warming. Trump has said trade-offs could be negotiated with the Kremlin that would permit Russia’s return to the group. There’s only one trade-off that should be on the table: President Putin, give back Crimea to Ukraine.

Also atop Trump’s summit agenda should be attempted Russian interference — past and quite possibly future — in the U.S. election process. The Kremlin has repeatedly denied meddling in the 2016 election cycle. Instead of denouncing that denial, Trump appears to sympathize with it. “Russia continues to say they had nothing do with Meddling in our Election!” Trump tweeted on Thursday. Trump should instead heed the view of his national security adviser, John Bolton, who has referred to Russia’s meddling in the presidential campaign as “a true act of war.”

There’s a long list of other Russian transgressions over which Trump should confront Putin. They include the case of the former Russian spy who, along with his daughter, was poisoned in Britain with nerve gas — a poisoning British authorities say Russia orchestrated. Also, Russia’s sponsorship of Syrian autocrat Bashar Assad, a lethal leader who has used chemical weapons on fellow Syrian citizens. And the Kremlin’s proxy war in eastern Ukraine, which keeps that country mired in a brutal separatist conflict.

If Trump challenges his Russian counterpart on these issues, the summit could be worthwhile. If he doesn’t, he risks seeming, once again, like putty in the hands of Putin, a former KGB agent who knows all too well the levers of manipulation and how to deftly use them on his enemies.

The Kremlin would like nothing more than to wangle a path toward the easing — or even lifting — of U.S. and Western sanctions still in place because of Crimea, other Russian influence in Ukraine and the meddling in America’s election process. We hope Trump’s conciliatory vibe toward Russia in recent days doesn’t foreshadow damaging giveaways. That would strengthen Putin in Russia and beyond — at the expense of the U.S., its western allies and the put-upon peoples of Ukraine and Syria.

The Chicago Tribune

Loading…

Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

Op Ed

February 15, 2019

On Bleecker Street in Manhattan, you can find both a Planned Parenthood clinic and a boutique for pregnant women.

According to Vogue, the store, Hatch, "is arguably the first of its kind, in that it was designed specifically for pregnant shoppers: Changing rooms have a size chart to help you figure…

kathrynlopez

February 15, 2019

The decision by Virginia's top three elected officials to hunker down and cling to their jobs is bad for both the state and the Democratic Party. If they won't go, the only thing to do is investigate them all.

Gov. Ralph Northam, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax and Attorney General Mark Herring have all…

Eugene Robinson

February 14, 2019

Of all the headlines about the scandals concerning the alleged past sins of one after another high official in Virginia, one struck me most poignantly. It was this, from the front page of The Washington Times:

"Democrats to vet candidates closely for secrets in past."

Maybe I have spent too much…

February 13, 2019

As our new legislative session fully uncoils, it's good to recall that just a few weeks ago workers in 20 states saw an increase in the minimum wage. The federal minimum, $7.25, was last raised in 2009. Since then, 29 states and dozens of cities and counties have chosen to exceed the federal floor.…

Gene Nichol

February 13, 2019

President Trump, in his State of the Union speech, broadly and wrongly portrayed illegal immigrants as murderers, rapists and drug dealers who must be stopped. But Trump does not limit his anti-immigrant zeal to them. In service to Trump, authorities are now handcuffing and shackling non-citizens…

Take Back North Carolina Press Conferece - US Attorney Robert Higdon speaks at press conference.jpg

February 13, 2019

Ten states and Washington, D.C., have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. Twenty-two other states, along with U.S. territories Puerto Rico and Guam, allow marijuana to be used for medical purposes. Let's examine some hidden issues about marijuana use.

Before we start, permit me to…

Walter Williams

February 12, 2019

Serving as speaker of the House has been good for Tim Moore's bank account.

The job of speaker isn't itself lucrative: $38,151 annually, plus $104 a day for housing and food when the legislature is in session. That's a decent income for many North Carolinians, but it's not going to buy you that…

Colin Campbell

February 11, 2019

North Carolina's franchise tax is a punitive and opaque tax levied on businesses organized under one of the usual corporate forms. It is inconsistent with both good economics and good government and should be abolished.

Conceptually the franchise tax is quite simple. It is a tax on the net value or…

Roy Cordato

February 11, 2019

There is a reason why most rural communities in North Carolina do not have broadband speeds of 25 megabytes per second, even after the state has spent more than $500 million on infrastructure over the last 10 years.

According to internet service providers, or ISPs, it is simply not profitable to…

021019bunnysanders

February 11, 2019

Richmond Times-Dispatch

Despite threats, pleas, and entreaties from senators and citizens, Democrats and Republicans, former governors and most of the General Assembly, Ralph Northam remains Virginia’s chief executive — at least the last time we checked. And it appears, according to the…

315 stories in Op Ed. Viewing 1 through 10.
«First Page   «Previous Page        
Page 1 of 32
        Next Page»   Last Page»