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BYH to everyone that keeps Christmas special by celebrating it in December, after Thanksgiving....

Veterans don't get to define 'respecting the flag'

Salil Puri

Salil Puri

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Sunday, September 9, 2018

Nike must have known, when it began its new ad campaign with Colin Kaepernick — who started the kneeling protests in the NFL — that it was courting controversy. "Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything," the text says, superimposed over Kaepernick's close-up. Veterans, not as stoic or stiff-lipped today as we once were, have been some of the most agitated about Nike's choice, resulting in plenty of righteous indignation. The five soldiers I served with who were killed in action eight years ago in Kandahar would surely define "sacrificing everything" differently than Nike does.

But while most veterans have been measured in their responses, one strand of criticism is particularly disturbing: the notion that kneeling during the anthem is a specific affront to veterans and service members. As Kurt Schlichter, a combat veteran and contributor for Fox News, put it, Kaepernick "is targeting us. He knows what this means to us. He knows how insulting it is. He knows how disrespectful it is, and Nike is empowering it." In a Facebook group for veterans that I belong to, someone wrote: "Anyone not respecting our flag should be deported. Many veterans and servicemen and women have died and suffered grievous wounds for this flag and anthem and constitution. Have some respect." This argument isn't new: Last year the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion chastised the protests as disrespectful.

This reasoning is rooted in a premise that is both wrong and dangerous. If kneeling for the anthem and the flag is a direct offense toward the military, that means veterans have a stronger claim to these symbols than Americans in general do. The argument insists that American iconography represents us more than it represents anyone else.

Yet the flag is not a symbol reserved for the military. It is a symbol of the United States of America, and it belongs equally to all citizens, including Americans who kneel during the anthem, or those who wear flag shirts (which is also in violation of the unenforceable flag code), or even those who burn the flag.

If we accept the idea that the military and veterans have authority over American symbols, we enforce a very narrow minority view of America and the American experience. Our cultural fabric is as rich as it is because the American myth has been interpreted, reinterpreted, criticized, praised and challenged by Americans of all backgrounds. If the military class were the arbiter of taste and ideology with regard to our iconography, we'd have a lot more of "13 Hours," the bogus and hagiographical Benghazi movie, and a lot less of "Stripes" or "Catch-22."

We are not an elite class of citizen elevated above our neighbors. When we start thinking of ourselves as a warrior caste, removed from the people we defend, we exacerbate the civilian-military divide. We indulge in an entitlement mentality that isn't healthy, demanding special treatment, such as discounts orrestrictions on fireworks that might upset vets with post-traumatic stress disorder. The message is, You're welcome for my service.

We should be able to dislike something without seeing it as a personal affront. We should be able to oppose something without becoming frothy-mouthed and obsessed, as some veterans online have done over Nike's ads. We should embrace Special Forces veteran Nate Boyer's insistence that we show compassion for those we don't agree with, while also acknowledging that everyone is free to boycott and destroy their Nike gear as they see fit.

What's more, believing that we have a special claim to the flag conflicts with the fundamental valuesof the armed forces, which elevates service over self. Serving is an honor the American people grant us, and it is Americans — in their totality — whom we serve. This does not give us license to appropriate national symbols as our own exclusive banners. Service is a privilege, not a way to purchase greater moral authority.

Salil Puri, who served in Afghanistan with the Army's Psychological Operations Regiment, is a senior consultant with the Culper Group.

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