Loading...
Some report that global warming is heating up and that it will get us all before ECU has another winning football...

If there's a will, is there a way?

Loading…

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Since 1954’s Hazel, the state had weathered storms fairly well. That luck has run out over the past few decades.

The people of North Carolina need to answer two big questions:

1. Do we think that experiencing three major-flood-producing hurricanes in 20 years is a “new normal"?

2. If yes, based on what we’ve seen since 1999, should we try to mitigate potential destruction and loss of life?

Folks near the coast have always lived with the threat of hurricanes. Certain steps were taken to reduce the impact should one strike. But we felt that the odds were on our side, and that the risk was manageable.

Since Hazel in 1954, each hurricane season — for the most part — would end up dealing us a good hand. Sure, there were a few times we didn’t win, but our losses were minimal. The odds were working nicely in our favor. Then we started drawing bad cards — specifically Fran, Floyd, Matthew and Florence. We did have a few aces up our sleeves — some beefed-up building codes; better storm forecasting, which allowed for better and earlier preparation; and counties and municipalities that had become more proactive in both hurricane preparation and response.

But those trump cards were not enough. We’ve been losing badly.

Try as we might, we can’t predict the future. But we still plan for it, making at least an educated guess and weighing risks. For a while now, scientists have warned that stronger, wetter and slower-moving hurricanes would be more common and cause more flooding. Plenty of people — politicians included — have responded with a big “phooey".

And that’s really at the heart of the first big question: Scientists say our odds are steadily worsening, but the doubters aren’t buying it. They see no need to do the things that the experts say could improve our odds. They are reluctant to change where and how we build things like houses, roads and sewer systems.

So who to believe? We would suggest that we can’t move forward proactively and effectively until we answer that question.

And even if there is a consensus that our hurricane odds are worsening, that doesn’t guarantee N.C. residents and political leaders will act. Furthermore, if there is a willingness to act to mitigate storm damage, what should we do and how will we pay for it?

StarNews of Wilmington

Loading…

Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

Op Ed

November 13, 2018

Jennifer Rubin, The Washington Post

"Saturday Night Live" comedian Pete Davidson got reamed for making a tasteless joke a week ago Saturday about Dan Crenshaw, a former Navy SEAL who lost his eye in combat in Afghanistan. Days later, Texans elected Crenshaw, a Republican, to Congress. On…

November 13, 2018

Democrats achieved significant victories this year in the “inner suburbs” of Charlotte, Raleigh, Greensboro, and North Carolina’s other major cities — tossing out GOP incumbents in the General Assembly, county commissions, and other offices.

Although Republicans did better…

john hood.jpg

November 13, 2018

North Carolina's urban-rural divide grew to a chasm in this month's election — at least in the state legislature.

Republicans suffered huge losses in urban counties, likely leaving the party with only two or three representatives from the two biggest counties: Wake and Mecklenburg. But…

Colin Campbell

November 12, 2018

The Telegraph of London, England

Although the EU, including Britain, is sticking to the nuclear deal unilaterally repudiated by President Trump, without America’s backing it is pretty much a dead duck. Since European companies that continue trading with Iran risk being hit by secondary U.S.…

November 12, 2018

Bill Friday was right. Friday, the founding president of the 16 campus University of North Carolina System, fought with then-Gov. Bob Scott in 1971 over the creation of the new system.

Friday recounted the fight in 2010, in an interview with me in front of an audience for NC SPIN’s 600th show.…

November 12, 2018

The East Room of the White House — with its vaulted ceilings, ornate chandeliers and gold curtains — is the closest thing to a throne room the United States has.

When set up for a presidential news conference, as it was on Wednesday morning, it is magisterial. The president is announced,…

Anthony Zurcher

November 12, 2018

The midterm elections flipped control of the U.S. House of Representatives to the Democrats and expanded the number of Republican held seats in the U.S. Senate. The voters sent a mixed message for Democrats to decipher as they look toward 2020.

Which messages worked and which candidates won in the…

douglascohn.jpg

November 11, 2018

Washington Post

President Donald Trump's Wednesday firing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions was not surprising, but it should still be shocking. Sessions' sin was not that he was insufficiently wedded to the president's agenda; indeed, the attorney general was perhaps the most effective member of…

November 11, 2018

President Donald Trump lost. And it was not even close.

On Tuesday, the president and his allies paid a high political price for their preposterous claims about caravans filled with leprosy, Middle Eastern terrorists, Hispanic "breeders" and gang invaders. Those lies cost the hobbled president…

JoeScarborough

November 11, 2018

Can’t you say anything good about President Donald Trump?

Some of my friends claim that I do not give our president a chance. They say I always overlook his good qualities. So I have decided to respond to that criticism by thinking of good things I can honestly say about him and then making a…

DGMartin.jpg
302 stories in Op Ed. Viewing 1 through 10.
«First Page   «Previous Page        
Page 1 of 31
        Next Page»   Last Page»