Loading...
Judging by the number of folks charged with driving under influence I am guessing the penalty is rather light. Of...

Closing the health care coverage gap good for business

Gates

Bruse Gates

Loading…

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Business leaders know firsthand that a strong workforce is essential to North Carolina’s economy. We also know that employee health is a big contributor to the strength of our workforce.

That’s why the N.C. East Alliance Chambers supports a solution to closing the health insurance coverage gap for working people in North Carolina.

A big contributor to good health is having insurance. People with health insurance are more likely to see a doctor when they get sick and have better overall health. And healthier employees are more productive and absent less.

Unfortunately, 13 percent of North Carolinians under 65 are uninsured, and the uninsurance rate is even higher in many rural eastern counties. These our are neighbors — they are construction workers, retail employees, restaurant workers, veterans and farmers. They are the bedrock of our communities.

Currently, a family of four with working parents cannot earn more than $12,000 to qualify for Medicaid. Many families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid also earn too little to qualify for federal subsidies and credits to help middle-class citizens purchase their own insurance. These people fall into a coverage gap.

I have two women working for me now who pay between $800 and $1,047 per month for health insurance. These premiums consume about 1/3 of their incomes, which puts a tremendous strain on their family finances. We need to find a health care solution that provides hard-working women like these an affordable option.

The good news is that we can follow the lead of 37 red and blue states and close the health insurance coverage gap. Doing so would allow an estimated 500,000 North Carolinians to gain access to affordable health care.

We all benefit from expanding access to insurance, starting with lower health care costs. When faced with a medical condition, those without insurance often have little choice but to rely on the emergency room, which legally must treat them regardless of ability to pay.

The cost of this care is passed on to consumers through higher insurance premiums and higher medical costs for those with insurance. That’s why premiums for people who buy their own health insurance are 7 percent lower on average in states that have closed their coverage gap compared to those that haven’t.

Closing the coverage gap is particularly powerful for rural hospitals and communities like ours in eastern North Carolina. Our hospitals are disproportionately affected when people don’t have health insurance.

With smaller margins to operate, rural hospitals often struggle to compensate for patients who can’t afford to pay for their care. Forty percent of North Carolina’s rural hospitals are operating in the red, and five have closed since 2014. We need to close the coverage gap to help keep their doors open.

And here’s the clincher, closing the coverage gap is fiscally responsible. It requires zero state dollars as the federal government pays 90 percent of the costs and the rest is paid by hospitals and health plans.

A report from George Washington University estimates that closing the coverage gap would generate over $200 million in economic activity in Wayne County alone.

There is increasing energy on both sides of the aisle to close the coverage gap. We call on our representatives, Democrat and Republican, to come together and find a bipartisan way to get it done that makes sense for North Carolina.

Bruce Gates is a Goldsboro Realtor and serves as the chair of the board of directors of the NCEast Alliance Chambers.

Loading…

Humans of Greenville

@HumansofGville

Local photographer Joe Pellegrino explores Greenville to create a photographic census of its people.

Op Ed

April 18, 2019

I recently spoke at the University of North Carolina Clean Tech Summit and I was inspired by our state’s enormous potential to fully transition to a clean energy economy. I challenged the students and business leaders in attendance to embrace disruption and exemplify the leadership North…

Michael S. Regan

April 18, 2019

On April 11, the ongoing saga of journalist and transparency activist Julian Assange took a dangerous turn.

Ecuador's president, Lenin Moreno, revoked his asylum in that country's London embassy. British police immediately arrested him — supposedly pursuant to his "crime" of jumping bail…

Knapp

April 17, 2019

There's a push to change laws to permit both criminals serving time and ex-criminals the right to vote. Guess which party is pushing the most for these legal changes. If you guessed that it was the Democrats, go to the head of the class. Bernie Sanders says states should allow felons to vote from…

April 16, 2019

The bribery scandal that has ensnared N.C. Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes couldn't be a more perfect example of how big money can corrupt state politics.

Hayes was indicted on charges that he'd worked with insurance company executive Greg Lindberg to bribe the state's insurance commissioner…

Colin Campbell

April 16, 2019

If you were to poll North Carolinians on an open-ended question about what they think the biggest threat to liberty is in the state, there would certainly be lots of different and diverse answers.

You might even see responses like "climate change" and "Yankees moving here." Democrats might say…

Ray Nothstine

April 15, 2019

The New York Times

Congress has landed on one of those rare ideas that commands support from both Democrats and Republicans. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one.

On Tuesday, the House approved legislation misleadingly titled the Taxpayer First Act that includes a provision prohibiting the Internal…

April 15, 2019

Keep your eye on Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., the only one in the crowded Democratic field to gain real traction since entering the race in January. She’s raised more money in the first quarter of this year than any other candidate except Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and in a California…

eleanorclift.jpg

April 15, 2019

If you live somewhere other than the western side of North Carolina’s Research Triangle region, you may not have thought that a long-planned light-rail line between Durham and Chapel Hill had much to do with you. So, when the $3 billion-plus project met its demise a few weeks ago, you may not…

john hood.jpg

April 14, 2019

The New York Times

Congress has landed on one of those rare ideas that commands support from both Democrats and Republicans. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one.

On Tuesday, the House approved legislation misleadingly titled the Taxpayer First Act that includes a provision prohibiting the Internal…

April 14, 2019

The N.C. General Assembly continues to wage a war against the poor and vulnerable in our state, further fanning the flames of health care inequality.

The fuel of this inferno, however, is real people’s lives. It’s time for the General Assembly to put out the flames of poverty, sickness…

Campaign 2016 Black Turnout
268 stories in Op Ed. Viewing 1 through 10.
«First Page   «Previous Page        
Page 1 of 27
        Next Page»   Last Page»