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ECU graduate students Daniel Beree, Jeffry O'Neill and Saxon Bisbee take measurements of a plantation boat on display at the Charleston Museum in South Carolina to document its construction. (Submitted photo/ECU Maritime Studies)
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ECU graduate students Daniel Beree, Jeffry O'Neill and Saxon Bisbee take measurements of a plantation boat on display at the Charleston Museum in South Carolina to document its construction. (Submitted photo/ECU Maritime Studies)

ECU students explore, document shipwrecks

By Ginger Livingston

The Daily Reflector

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Efforts to document two shipwrecks in South Carolina's Cooper River by East Carolina University students and researchers ended up with more questions than answers about who used the boats.

Shards of Native American pottery discovered in wreckage at a site called the Pimlico shipwreck have researchers asking if it's evidence that the ship's owners possessed Native Americans slaves, if there was trade between Native Americans and individuals who worked on the ship or if perhaps it's debris that washed in the wreckage.


Discovering such a mystery is what drives students and researchers in ECU's Maritime Studies program.

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Bless your heart
Bless your heart