Loading...
BYH, I hope you don't have pre-existing conditions, because with this latest bill being rushed through, you'd no longer...

Mixer Artist Spotlight: Kimberly Brown wears art on her sleeve

070117MArtist
1 of 6

Kimberly Brown

070117MArtist
070117MArtist
070117MArtist
070117MArtist
070117MArtist
Loading…

Story and photos by Joe Pellegrino
jpellegrino@reflector.com

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Local textile artist Kimberly Brown’s crochet animal creations can frequently be seen peppered throughout Greenville. Brown creates a variety of art using textiles, from crochet movie characters to tie-dye silk scarves and dinner napkins. See more of her work at www.facebook.com/highfiberdesigns. 

Mixer: How did you start making art? 

Kimberly Brown: I guess I have always been into art ever since I could first remember. My start in textiles was when I was about 8. My grandmother showed me how to crochet. I didn’t take to it right away because we were just kind of making these hideous afghans. But I started to teach myself more from there and that was the start of my art career. I taught myself how to knit and how to sew, and I eventually ended up at ECU studying textiles. 

M: How would you describe your process? 

KB: I feel like most artists sketch things out, but I almost never draw anything. I normally try to compose it the best I can in my head and I just start working on that shape from there. I guess it depends on how specific I want to get as well though, because sometimes I just dye fabrics with no particular image in mind. I just have a color scheme I want or something. Dying fabrics is a more random and abstract process. I have less control over the end product. When I crochet it is different. When I am going to crochet a stuffed animal or something, I definitely have an end shape in mind and plan it out in my head beforehand. I really like making wearable art because I like making pieces that have some kind of practical purpose. 

M: How do you feel your personality affects what you create? 

KB: People have told me that I have my own style and that my own personality and myself show through in my art a lot, but I have had others tell me the opposite. A lot of artists stick to one particular color scheme, but I am kind of all over the place. I guess as a person I am also all over the place but still consistent and established in how I feel about certain things. You could say my art reflects that.

In my conceptual art, I sometimes focus a lot on neurodivergency and mental illnesses, like giving a sense of anxiety through repetition. Repetition is a big theme in a lot of my conceptual art. I myself have anxiety, PTSD, I am a sexual assault survivor and emotional abuse survivor and I’m somewhere on the autism spectrum -— which all ends up in my work. I feel like autistic people experience sensory things differently and I feel like that influences my art a lot. I really like busy things and bright colors, so I work in a lot of tiny detail and a pack a lot of visual input into my pieces. 

M: What do you hope people take from your art? 

KB: I don’t know honestly. I guess I hope they get whatever kind of conceptual meaning I am trying to convey, but even if they don’t get that, I try to make my art aesthetically pleasing. So if you don’t get it conceptually, you can still think it’s a nice-looking piece and be moved visually. With production pieces that aren’t conceptual, I just want people to be able to enjoy them. I get a really tactile experience during the creation process and hope that others get to experience that, too. 

Loading…