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FILE - This Monday, Feb. 18, 2013 file photo shows North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory during the State of the State address at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, N.C. State elections officials are calling for an investigation of nearly a quarter million dollars in political donations to dozens of North Carolina candidates from an Oklahoma sweepstakes operator, contributions that may violate state campaign finance laws. McCrory, state House Speaker Thom Tillis and Senate leader Phil Berger are among those who received the checks, most of which were distributed by a Charlotte lobbying firm where McCrory worked until just before he took office. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)

Ted Richardson

FILE - This Monday, Feb. 18, 2013 file photo shows North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory during the State of the State address at the Legislative Building in Raleigh, N.C. State elections officials are calling for an investigation of nearly a quarter million dollars in political donations to dozens of North Carolina candidates from an Oklahoma sweepstakes operator, contributions that may violate state campaign finance laws. McCrory, state House Speaker Thom Tillis and Senate leader Phil Berger are among those who received the checks, most of which were distributed by a Charlotte lobbying firm where McCrory worked until just before he took office. (AP Photo/Ted Richardson)

Editorial: McCrory falls short on pledge

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Republican nominee Pat McCrory held a commanding lead in the polls when he entered the third and final gubernatorial debate against his Democratic opponent Walter Dalton last year. So when asked what new restrictions on access to abortion he would support were he elected to the state’s highest office, McCrory had no need to pander to moderate voters with his answer.

“None,” he said, declining to elaborate on a response that he can expect to see repeated for years to come. Try as he might to frame his signing of Senate Bill 353 as something other than new restrictions on abortion, the facts about this legislation say otherwise — and they speak as clearly as North Carolina’s next chief executive did when asked about the issue last fall.

The N.C. General Assembly has done a great deal to inspire disappointment and ire from those within the state —and ridicule outside it — but few actions generated as much resentment as lawmakers’ actions in regard to abortion. Not only were people upset by the new restrictions themselves, but they rightfully condemned the manner in which the Legislature approached those changes.

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Comments

The Law Makes Sense......

I see no reason why abortion clinics should not have same operating standards an ambulatory surgery center has......It will afford women better health care........though the baby's fate is the same- death....... Odd that the pro choice crowd is in such a rush to see how many babies can be killed each year........They say they advocate for women, but ignore the fact that about half the babies who are killed are female........

But then again

But then again you could make a case that abortion clinics need further regulation: "Raleigh, N.C. -- In response to inquiries, the Department of Health and Human Services confirmed today that it has suspended the license of a medical clinic in Asheville, N.C. which specializes in abortions. After a routine survey of FEMCARE, Inc., inspectors found egregious violations of existing rules that revealed an imminent threat to the health and safety of patients. "Inspectors from Division of Health Service Regulation (DHSR) found the facility failed to comply with 23 separate rules," said Drexdal Pratt, Director of DHHS' Division of Health Service Regulation (DHSR). "We take rule violations very seriously and, when necessary, take firm action to prevent harm to patients and clients in the facilities that we license regulate and inspect." In addition to other findings, the survey found the facility: • Failed to maintain anesthesia (nitrous oxide gas) delivery systems in good working condition, with torn masks and tubing held together with tape.This could lead to patients not receiving the intended dosage and risk patients not being fully sedated during surgical procedures, leading to pain and physical harm. • Failed to ensure emergency equipment had weekly checks to ensure the equipment was suitable for use in patient care and failed to ensure that emergency medicine wasn't expired. • Failed to have a resuscitator available. • Failed to sweep and mop the operating room floor and failed to properly clean operating room beds. • Failed to have a director of nursing responsible and accountable for all nursing services. • Failed to have an agreement/contract with an anesthetist or anesthesiologist. • Failed to have an agreement/contract with a registered pharmacist to assure appropriate methods, procedures and controls for obtaining, dispensing, and administering drugs. FEMCARE, Inc.'s last inspection was on January 16, 2007, a follow up inspection of a previous survey, which found the clinic in violation of personnel and quality assurance rules." ---- Reports are that under Mike & Bev the clinic was last inspected in Jan., 2007. I hope our restaurants get inspected more frequently than that. The voters can decide the merits of promises and abortion at the ballot box.

Is anyone surprised?

McCrory's bald faced lie about not signing new abortion restriction laws just shows that Republicans will say anything to get into power, then afterward just do what they want. He must be a politician, or something. At this point I don't believe a thing they say.

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Bless your heart
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