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In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Amber Skiles, a contractor with the Environmental Protection Agency labels water samples from the Dan River as state and federal environmental officials continued their investigations of a spill of coal ash in Eden, N.C. Over the last year, environmental groups have tried three times to use the federal Clean Water Act to force Duke Energy to clear out leaky coal ash dumps. Each time, the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources has effectively halted the lawsuit by intervening at the last minute to assert its own authority to take enforcement action. In two cases, the state has proposed modest fines but no requirement that the nationГ­s largest electricity provider actually clean up the coal ash ponds. The third case is pending. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Gerry Broome

In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, Amber Skiles, a contractor with the Environmental Protection Agency labels water samples from the Dan River as state and federal environmental officials continued their investigations of a spill of coal ash in Eden, N.C. Over the last year, environmental groups have tried three times to use the federal Clean Water Act to force Duke Energy to clear out leaky coal ash dumps. Each time, the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources has effectively halted the lawsuit by intervening at the last minute to assert its own authority to take enforcement action. In two cases, the state has proposed modest fines but no requirement that the nationГ­s largest electricity provider actually clean up the coal ash ponds. The third case is pending. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Editorial: Lessons for fracking

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Gov. Pat McCrory’s response to the massive coal ash spill into the Dan River points to the potentially dire effects on a major source of drinking water for North Carolina citizens. The environmental disaster involving Duke Energy, the governor’s former employer, further highlights the need for extreme caution regarding another potential threat to the state’s water resources — the process for natural gas exploration known as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.”

The N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources on Friday issued violation notices and enforcement recommendations to Duke Energy nearly a month after the company’s coal ash spill was discovered on Feb. 2.

The DENR cited Duke Energy for several violations of water quality laws, rules and permit conditions. For violations related to a lack of proper federal stormwater discharging permits, the company can be fined up to $25,000 per day, according to Friday’s DENR notice.

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Comments

Did we read anything about it from you

Math? I don't recall seeing you express your outrage.

Does Gov. McCrory support unregulated greed?

"Caution" is hardly the advice this Governor needs since he worships at the altar of corporate money sent to him by faceless corporations who give lip service to public safety while rejecting public health, science, truth and the rule of law. Governor McCrory's only view of human dignity appears to include the wealthiest companies and individuals that "accidently" dump toxins on ordinary citizens with no consequences.

How about those permits?

Wasn't the Easley administration connected with selling permits for coastal development. I recall the Little Governor going to prison for a year and have this recollection of the sale of permits being discussed. Would the selling of permits be considered "unregulated greed?"

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Bless your heart
Bless your heart