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After pitching played a crucial role in determining the first four games of the District 4 9-11 Year Old championship series, the opening four innings of Friday night’s Game Five made it appear the decisive game would be no different.

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East Carolina baseball coach Cliff Godwin routinely said that his team was playing with house money as the Pirates entered the postseason. After all, it took some time for the Pirates to match the preseason Top-15 hype.

Adam Ulffers played his high school lacrosse at J.H. Rose and is set to take his play to the next level at Randolph College after signing his National Letter of Intent this past spring.

Brook Valley will play host to the annual Pirate Cup Golf Tournament on Sept. 3 with former East Carolina golf team member and current PGA professional Harold Varner III serving as host for the event.

Nice move Supreme Court. Take away the responsibility for regulating dangerous carbon emissions from the scientific experts at the EPA and give them to legislators who get huge sums of cash from energy company lobbyists. This stupid move comes with climate disasters nipping at our heels.

On this Independence Day we might do well to reflect not only on that date in 1776 in Philadelphia but also on that date in 1863 in Gettysburg. There during July 1st, 2nd and 3rd, 1863, occurred the largest battlefield carnage in our history. On July 4th the Northern and Southern armies face…

Just days after declaring pregnancy a sacrament, the Supreme Court announced a bold ruling in favor of performative Christianity. Never mind this tiresome business about no establishment of religion; the holy Republican majority in their priestly robes have liberated the nation’s public scho…

It’s funny how Amazon makes it possible to crush Christmas into tiny crumbs of hard candy that may be drizzled across the year like sprinkles on cupcakes. This gives us manageable amounts of anticipation instead of the crushing landslide-tsunami-collision of planets type of expectation that …

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State AP Stories

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Tropical Storm Colin has brought rain and winds to parts of North and South Carolina, though the storm has weakened and conditions are expected to improve by Monday's July Fourth celebrations. Separately, the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie rolled into the Pacific on Saturday after a rapid march across Central America, where it caused flooding, downed trees and forced thousands of people to evacuate in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Forecasters say Bonnie is likely to become a hurricane by Monday off the southern coast of Mexico, but it is unlikely to make a direct hit on land.

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general has not yet indicated whether he will ask a court to lift the injunction on a state law banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Attorney General Josh Stein told Republican lawmakers on Friday that his department’s attorneys are reviewing the litigation that led a federal court to strike down the 20-week ban. His letter responds to GOP demands that he take immediate action in the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion protections. Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore warned last week Stein's inaction would lead them to get involved.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear a case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures and blocking state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday threw out the 2020 conspiracy and bribery convictions of a major political donor in North Carolina and his associate, declaring that the trial judge erred in his jury instructions.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Republican legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled state budget adjustments for the coming year, proposing to spend or set aside billions in expected extra tax collections to raise worker pay, recruit companies, build more infrastructure and combat inflation.

National & World AP Stories

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Authorities say a Black man was unarmed when Akron police chased him on foot and killed him in a hail of gunfire, but officers believed he had shot at them earlier from a vehicle and feared he was preparing to fire again. Akron police released video Sunday of the pursuit and killing of 25-year-old Jayland Walker. The mayor called the June 27 shooting “heartbreaking” while asking for patience from the community. It isn't yet clear how many shots were fired by the eight officers who were involved, but Walker sustained more than 60 wounds.

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Danish police say three people were killed and three others are in critical condition after a shooting at a shopping mall in Copenhagen. Copenhagen police inspector Søren Thomassen says the three victims in Sunday's attack are a man in his 40s and “two young people.” Thomassen says a 22-year-old Danish man was arrested after the shooting. He tells reporters there is no indication that anyone else was involved, though police aere still investigating. Thomassen says it is too early to speculate on the motive for the shooting. It happened in the late afternoon at Field’s, one of the biggest shopping malls in Scandinavia. According to witnesses, when the shots rang out, some people hid in shops while others fled in a panicked stampede.

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Kathy Gannon has reported on Afghanistan for the AP for the past 35 years, during an extraordinary series of events and regime changes that have rocked the world. Through it all, the kindness and resilience of ordinary Afghans have shone through for her – which is also what has made it so painful for her, she says, to watch the slow erosion of their hope. Gannon says she has always been amazed at how Afghans stubbornly hung on to hope against all odds, greeting each of several new regimes with optimism. But by 2018, a Gallup poll showed that the fraction of people in Afghanistan with hope in the future was the lowest ever recorded anywhere. It didn’t have to be this way, Gannon says.

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Kathy Gannon has reported on Afghanistan for the AP for the past 35 years, during an extraordinary series of events and regime changes that have rocked the world. Through it all, the kindness and resilience of ordinary Afghans have shone through for her – which is also what has made it so painful for her, she says, to watch the slow erosion of their hope. Gannon says she has always been amazed at how Afghans stubbornly hung on to hope against all odds, greeting each of several new regimes with optimism. But by 2018, a Gallup poll showed that the fraction of people in Afghanistan with hope in the future was the lowest ever recorded anywhere. It didn’t have to be this way, Gannon says.

Hershel W. “Woody” Williams, the last remaining Medal of Honor recipient from World War II, will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin announced the honor during a memorial service on Sunday where Williams was remembered for his courage, humility and selflessness. Williams went ahead of his unit in February 1945 and eliminated a series of Japanese machine gun positions over several hours. Later that year, the 22-year-old Williams received the Medal of Honor from President Harry Truman. He died on Wednesday at 98. Gen. David H. Berger, commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, also spoke at the Sunday memorial. He said of Williams, "As long as there are Marines, his legacy will live on.”

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A large chunk of a glacier in Italy's Alps has broken loose and killed at least six hikers and injured nine others. Alpine rescue service officials provided the death toll Sunday evening and said it could take hours to determine if any hikers might be missing, with unconfirmed reports saying there could be as many as 15 unaccounted for. The National Alpine and Cave Rescue Corps tweeted that the search of the area of Marmolada peak involved helicopters and rescue dogs. On Sunday night, the corps posted a phone number for callers whose loved ones might not have returned from excursions near the glacier.

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Russia has claimed control over the last Ukrainian stronghold in an eastern province that is key to achieving a major goal of Moscow’s grinding war. The General Staff of Ukraine’s military reported Sunday that its forces had withdrawn from Lysychansk in Luhansk province. Ukraine's president acknowledged the withdrawal in his nightly video address but said his forces would return with more modern weapons. If confirmed, Russia’s complete seizure of Luhansk would provide its troops with a stronger base from which to press their advance in the Donbas. Russian President Vladimir Putin is bent on capturing that region in a campaign that could determine the course of the entire war.

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An amateur soccer tournament in France aimed at celebrating ethnic diversity is attracting talent scouts, sponsors and increasing public attention by uniting young players from low-income neighborhoods with high-profile names in the sport. The National Neighborhoods Cup is intended to shine a positive spotlight on working-class areas with large immigrant populations that some politicians and commentators scapegoat as breeding grounds for crime, riots and Islamic extremism. Players with Congolese heritage beat a team with Malian roots 5-4 on Saturday in the one-month tournament’s final match that was held at the home stadium of a third-division French team in the Paris suburb of Creteil. The final was broadcast live on Prime Video.