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A new boat builder that had been operating without a permit in Greenville for a year has now been granted the air quality license from the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Air Quality, the division announced Thursday

Refugee roundtable: Interfaith Refugee Ministry will hold a refugee roundtable from 4-5 p.m. on Sunday at St. Timothy Episcopal Church, 107 Louis St. The event will offer information about participation and feature former refugees, volunteers and IRM staff. Donations of personal care products and gently used or new kitchen items will be accepted. Call 635-6459 and visit www.helpingrefugees.org


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FARMVILLE — After surrendering an opening-drive score, Farmville Central scored 39 unanswered points on its way to a 46-14 Homecoming victory over visiting Ayden-Grifton in an Eastern Plains 2A Conference football game Friday night.

In response to “Good News Greenville,” your comment to the entire Lake Glenwood community based on a flag you saw at one residence was uncalled for and an untrue description of the community. It was a rude and childish attack. With so much going on to divide America right now, your comment i…

The Supreme Court’s June overrule of Roe v. Wade denies women the right to control their bodies. Those privacy rights are constitutionally guaranteed — to women and men — by the 14th Amendment, the same amendment that underpinned the Court’s original decision affirming women’s right to abortion.

The New York Times put it starkly. A recent poll with Siena College shows Democrats “faring far worse than they have in the past with Hispanic voters.” Only 56% say they’ll back Democratic candidates this fall, with Republicans getting 32%. Just two years ago, President Biden received 63% of…

The South Ayden High School Class of 1967 celebrated their 55th year reunion during Labor Day weekend at The Rock Springs Center in Greenville with a senior prom. Three former South Ayden High School teachers were honored during this reunion gala on Sept. 2.

She looked at me with an interesting smile, so I smiled back at her. I didn’t say anything, though, because I was in the middle of a song. I had been asked, along with some other musicians, to play at a “music in the streets” type of event in Washington, so a lot of people passed by. But, sh…

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State AP Stories

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Forty years after a predominantly Black community in Warren County, North Carolina, rallied against hosting a hazardous waste landfill, President Joe Biden’s top environment official has returned to what is widely considered the birthplace of the environmental justice movement to unveil a national office that will distribute $3 billion in block grants to underserved communities burdened by pollution. Joined by civil rights leaders and participants from the 1982 protests, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan announced Saturday that he is dedicating a new senior level of leadership to the environmental justice movement they ignited. The new Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights will merge three existing EPA programs.

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North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Ted Budd is leaning into his support for abortion restrictions and his allegiance to former President Donald Trump as Democrats fight for an elusive victory in the Southern swing state. Democratic optimism remains tempered given the state’s recent red tilt. But Democratic officials believe Budd's candidacy gives them a real chance at flipping a Senate seat — and the balance of power in Washington — this fall. Budd appeared alongside Trump at a rally in Wilmington Friday night, where the former president praised the candidate as “a conservative, America First all-star in Congress” and urged his supporters to turn out to vote.

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The White House is reaching out to local governments. It hosted officials from North Carolina on Thursday to highlight funding opportunities and hear firsthand how coronavirus relief, infrastructure dollars and other policies are faring in communities. A key message for the visit by North Carolina officials is the recovery in manufacturing. The event reflects new efforts to expand the use of the White House campus as pandemic restrictions have eased. But it’s also part of a larger effort to host municipal and county officials on a weekly basis from all 50 states. That outreach coincides with campaigning for November’s midterm elections as the White House tries to energize Democratic voters.

On the same day the Federal Reserve gave a sobering report on the U.S. economy’s trajectory, administration officials highlighted how they have kept some of the nation’s smallest businesses afloat through the pandemic. Roughly $8.28 billion has been disbursed to 162 community financial institutions across the country, through Treasury’s Emergency Capitol Investment Program, officials said Wednesday. Vice President Kamala Harris said that “There is almost $9 billion on the ground right now” for community banks and lenders. She was referring to pandemic relief funds dedicated to loans for minority-owned businesses and low-income individuals who generally have a hard time getting access to capital.

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North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper's budget director since he took office in early 2017 is retiring from the post. Cooper announced on Monday the upcoming departure of Charlie Perusse and that Kristin Walker will be his successor. Perusse served as budget director for two other Democratic governors in Mike Easley and Beverly Perdue from late 2008 to early 2011. His top job is carrying out the annual state budget of $27.9 billion and other spending directives approved by the legislature. The director also deals with revenue shortfalls and surpluses. Walker will become North Carolina’s first female budget director.

National & World AP Stories

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HAVANA (AP) — Cuba held a rare referendum Sunday on an unusually contentious law — a government-backed “family law” code that would allow same-sex couples to marry and adopt, as well as outlining the rights of children and grandparents.

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Typhoon Noru has blown out of the northern Philippines and left at least five rescuers dead, caused floods and power outages and forced officials to suspend classes and government work in the capital and outlying provinces. The most powerful typhoon to hit the country this year slammed into Quezon province before nightfall on Sunday then weakened as it barreled overnight across the main Luzon region. Thousands of people were moved to emergency shelters, some forcibly, ahead of the storm. The governor of Bulacan province said five rescuers were struck by a collapsed wall while using a boat and apparently drowned in floodwaters.

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Authorities in Cuba have suspended classes in Pinar del Rio province and say they will begin evacuations Monday as Tropical Storm Ian is forecast to strengthen into a hurricane before reaching the western part of the island on its way to Florida. A hurricane warning was in effect for Grand Cayman and the Cuban provinces of Isla de Juventud, Pinar del Rio and Artemisa. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Ian should reach the far-western part of Cuba late Monday or early Tuesday, hitting near the country’s most famed tobacco fields. It could become a major hurricane Tuesday. State media say authorities would begin evacuating people from vulnerable areas early Monday.

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Italian voters have shifted sharply, rewarding a party with neo-fascist roots and bolstering prospects the country could have its first far-right-led government since World War II. Partial results Monday from the election for Parliament suggested far-right leader Giorgia Meloni and her Brothers of Italy party were winning Sunday's vote. In a victory speech, Meloni struck a moderate tone, saying: "If we are called to govern this nation, we will do it for everyone, we will do it for all Italians and we will do it with the aim of uniting the people (of this country).”

DENVER (AP) — Melvin Gordon atoned for two fumbles with a late 1-yard touchdown run and safety Kareem Jackson recovered Jeff Wilson Jr.'s fumble with 1:05 left to preserve the Denver Broncos' 11-10 win over the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday night.

Virtually everyone involved agrees that the powerful U.N. Security Council needs to expand and include more voices. But as with so many things, the central question is exactly how. Five countries that were powers at World War II’s end have dominated the United Nations and its most important body for its 77-year history. The council remains in its current configuration despite a growing, four-decade clamor for other countries to join that VIP group to reflect the dramatically changed 21st-century world. The failure of the council to respond to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has shone a spotlight on another failure: It can't seem to increase its inclusivity.

The Japanese leader who normalized relations with China 50 years ago feared for his life when he flew to Beijing for the high-stakes negotiations at the peak of the Cold War. That's according to his daughter, a former Japanese foreign minister who spoke to The Associated Press ahead of the 50th anniversary Thursday of the communique Kakuei Tanaka signed with China's Zhou Enlai. Tanaka was confident and ambitious, his daughter says, but his mission to normalize relations with China was a huge gamble. He told her before leaving that he would resign if his mission failed. The visit in 1972 followed President Richard Nixon's visit to China months earlier that transformed the then-isolated nation's position in the world.

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A U.S. aircraft carrier and its battle group have launched drills with South Korean warships off the Korean Peninsula’s east coast in their first such training in five years. The four-day training that began Monday came a day after North Korea test-fired a short-range ballistic missile in a possible response to the exercise. South Korea's navy says the drills are aimed at demonstrating the allies’ “powerful resolve to respond to North Korean provocations” and improving their ability to perform joint naval operations. It says more than 20 U.S. and South Korean navy ships, including the nuclear-powered USS Ronald Reagan are mobilized for the drills,