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Impact luncheon: The Center for Family Violence Prevention annual IMPACT Event will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday at the Greenville Convention Center, 303 S. W. Greenville Blvd. The theme is “Silent Shame-Driving Awareness for Emotional Abuse.” Guest speaker will be author, minister and domestic violence survivor Jan Newell-Byrd. Tickets are $50 each. Visit www.c4fvp.org.


Local Events

Bless our hearts. I see from the state election judicial guide that judges for the state Supreme and Appeals Court seats are running by party. Seems that Democrat judges vote the party line same as Democrat politicians. If the voters want their decisions upheld, it is time to get rid of prog…

One of the fundamental principles of the U.S. system of government is that the legislative and executive bodies are limited by a constitution. Whether the constitution has been violated is determined by a judicial system that should be independent of the other branches of government. This wa…

Democrat leaders have failed to do their basic job of passing a budget and spending/appropriations bills via Regular Order or for that matter even as a Continuing Resolution once again. It is quite apparent that Democrats are just too busy with other pressing matters like producing the “Trum…

In his successful 1980 campaign for the presidency, Ronald Reagan prominently featured the prospect of welfare fraud, citing the case of a Chicago “welfare queen” who had defrauded the government of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Since then, policing and preventing welfare cheats has been…

To the one equating flying illegal immigrants to Martha’s Vineyard to mass extermination of Jews in the Holocaust during the holocaust: what is it like not being tethered to reality? BYH, you need help.

“Whoever dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, ‘He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.’” Psalms 91:1-2.

Don’t underestimate the lentil. These tiny, pebble-like legumes may be a tad frumpy in appearance, but any perceived drabness or lumpiness shouldn’t deter you from eating them. Lentils are rich in plant-based protein and fiber and are an excellent source of B vitamins, magnesium and potassiu…

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State AP Stories

President Joe Biden is working to create a manufacturing revival. He's even helping to put factory jobs in Republican territory under the belief it can help restore faith in U.S. democracy. The latest development came Tuesday, when chipmaker Micron announced an investment of up to $100 billion over the next 20-plus years to build a plant in upstate New York that could create 9,000 factory jobs. It’s a commitment made in a GOP congressional district that Biden and the company credited to the recently enacted $280 billion CHIPS and Science Act. Biden's goal is to keep opening new factories in states where Democrats’ footholds are shaky at best.

In Georgia’s pivotal U.S. Senate race, Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and his Republican challenger, Herschel Walker, have each sought to cast the other as an abortion extremist. At the same time, they deflect questions about the details of their own positions on the issue. The sidestepping reflects the sensitivity of abortion politics in a post-Roe v. Wade America, where the procedure is open to regulation by state governments and, potentially, by Congress. But Walker’s strategy may not work much longer after The Daily Beast reported Monday that he paid for a girlfriend’s 2009 abortion — a blatant contradiction of his claims that there’s “no excuse” for a procedure he characterizes as “killing.” Walker called the report a lie.

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Advocates say schools increasingly are removing children with disabilities from the classroom because of behavior issues related to their disability but not recording the actions as suspension. The practice is known as informal removal, which advocates say amounts to a form of off-the-books, de facto denial of education that evades accountability. Because the removals aren’t recorded, there’s no way to quantify how often they happen. But the assistant secretary for the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights, Catherine E. Lhamon, says the practice has "taken hold in a way that is dangerous for students and needs to be addressed.”

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A Delaware judge says cigarette manufacturer ITG Brands assumed liability for tobacco settlement payments to the state of Florida when it acquired four brands from Reynolds American in 2015. Vice Chancellor Lori Will also said in Friday's ruling that ITG must compensate Reynolds American for losses due to that assumed liability. Reynolds sold the Kool, Winston, Salem and Maverick brands to ITG in 2014 to gain federal regulators' approval of Reynolds’ acquisition of Lorillard Inc. Before the sale closed, Reynolds American affiliate R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. was making payments under a preexisting settlement agreement with Florida for reimbursement of smoking-related health care costs.

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North Carolina’s State Board of Elections is directing county election officials not to engage in signature matching when reviewing absentee ballot envelopes this fall after a judge rejected the GOP appeal of a state board ruling prohibiting the practice. According to a directive sent to county election directors from the board’s legal counsel Paul Cox, the judge’s ruling maintains the status quo outlined in state law. Superior Court Judge Stephan Futrell ruled from the bench Monday afternoon, denying the party’s motion for a temporary restraining order and preventing the use of signature matching in the 2022 general election, state board spokesperson Pat Gannon said.

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Emergency responders are seeking to evacuate residents from the largest barrier island off Florida's Gulf Coast, and survivors there spoke of the terror of riding out Hurricane Ian in flooded homes and howling winds. A volunteer group, Medic Corps, was flying residents off Pine island by helicopter on Saturday. The bridge to Pine Island was heavily damaged by the hurricane, leaving it reachable only by boat or air. Some residents said they hadn’t seen anyone from outside the island for days and spoke of being trapped in flooded homes as boats and other debris crashed around their houses in the storm surge. Some feared they wouldn't make it.

Local election officials across the United States are bracing for a wave of confrontations on Election Day in November. Emboldened Republican poll watchers, including many who embrace former President Donald Trump’s falsehoods about the 2020 election, are expected to flood election offices and polling places. The Republican Party and conservative activists have been holding poll watcher training sessions, but in many states they've barred the media from observing those sessions. Some Republican-led states passed laws after the 2020 election that require local election offices to allow poll watchers and give them expanded access to observe and challenge ballots.

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The remnants of Hurricane Ian have downed trees and power lines across North Carolina, and at least four storm-related fatalities.. The Johnston County Sheriff's Office says a woman found her husband dead early Saturday morning after he went to check on a generator running in their garage overnight. North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper's office says there were also two storm-related traffic fatalities in Johnston County on Friday, and a drowning in Martin County. Damage reports across the state were less severe than in South Carolina and Florida. But over 90,000 people statewide were without power Saturday afternoon. That was down from over 330,000 earlier in the day.

National & World AP Stories

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Wall Street is giving back some of its big gains from earlier in the week, as rising bond yields amp up the pressure on markets again. The S&P 500 fell 1.5% in morning trading Wednesday. It’s coming off its best two-day rally since the spring of 2020, spurred in part by hopes a softening economy may convince central banks to take it easier on interest-rate hikes. But analysts have said such hopes may be premature. A report on U.S. job growth at private employers came in stronger than expected Wednesday, as did a report on the services sector.

NYON, Switzerland (AP) — Hosting World Cup matches in 2030 would be “the dream of people who survived the horrors of war,” Ukrainian soccer federation president Andriy Pavelko said Wednesday after his country launched a joint bid with Spain and Portugal.

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A tender letter that author John Steinbeck penned to his son after the teen confessed he was in love for the first time is going up for auction. Boston-based RR Auction says the handwritten two-page letter shows the Nobel literature laureate's empathy and his expertise on matters of the heart. Thomas Steinbeck was 14 when he told his parents he was in love. His famous father wrote back: “If it is right, it happens — The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away." The “Of Mice and Men” and “Grapes of Wrath” author died in 1968. His son died in 1991.

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This year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Americans Carolyn R. Bertozzi and K. Barry Sharpless, and Danish scientist Morten Meldal for developing a way of “snapping molecules together" that can be used to design better medicines. They were cited for their work on click chemistry and bioorthogonal reactions, which are used to make cancer drugs, map DNA and create materials that are tailored to a specific purpose. Hans Ellegren, secretary general of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, announced the winners Wednesday at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Dallas baseball fan Cory Youmans made the catch of a lifetime, snagging the ball that New York Yankees slugger Aaron Judge hit for his American League-record 62nd home run. Youmans caught the prized souvenir on the fly Tuesday night at Globe Life Field, home of the Texas Rangers. Youmans, who works in the financial world, said he hasn't decided what he'll do with ball. Youmans was at the second game of a doubleheader between the Yankees and Rangers when Judge led off with a home run. Soon after a local TV station posted a brief interview with the lucky fan, Bri Amaranthus tweeted: “THIS IS MY HUSBAND.” Amaranthus works in local media and is an alum of ABC’s “The Bachelor.”

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Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed laws absorbing four Ukrainian regions into Russia. His move finalizes an annexation carried out in violation of international law. In a defiant move, the Kremlin on Wednesday held the door open for further land grabs in Ukraine. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said that “certain territories will be reclaimed, and we will keep consulting residents who would be eager to embrace Russia.” Kremlin-orchestrated “referendums” that Ukraine and Western leaders rejected as a sham preceded the annexation of Ukraine’s Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia regions into Russia. However, Russia's military is struggling to control the illegally absorbed areas.

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Elon Musk wants Twitter again — and Twitter is game. The billionaire Tesla CEO has proposed buying the company at the originally agreed-on price of $44 billion. That brings the tumultuous, monthslong saga another step closer to a conclusion. Musk made the surprising turnaround in a letter to Twitter that the company disclosed in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. It came less than two weeks before a trial between the two parties over Musk’s attempt to back out of the deal is scheduled to start in Delaware. Musk also faced a scheduled deposition by Twitter attorneys starting Thursday.

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As Hurricane Ian flooded Naples, Florida, one man went to rescue his 86-year-old mom from her home after she had refused to evacuate. He sent photos and short videos to his family, letting them know he was OK. That's how Johnny Lauder ended up unintentionally documenting the whole rescue. His mom Karen had lost a leg and requires a wheelchair. As the waters rose, she called her son for help. Lauder swam, waded and walked about a half mile to reach her, and could hear her screaming as he reached the house. Several hours later, the water subsided enough for him to push her through the streets to safety.