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The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution gave its Community Service Award to a Snow Hill man his ongoing efforts to preserve the heritage of the Tuscarora people.

A couple operating a Christian study space in their former home on Elizabeth Street will have to wait on a decision that would allow them to install parking lots after the Greenville Board of Adjustment postponed action on a special use permit.

Volunteer expo: The Junior League of Greenville will hold its annual volunteer expo from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. today at the Greenville Convention Center, 303 S.W. Greenville Blvd. Connect with 30-plus community organizations offering volunteer opportunities.

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The East Carolina men’s basketball team found its way into the win column when it snapped a five-game losing skid with a home win over Tulsa on Tuesday. Now, the Pirates are looking to string together back-to-back wins for the first time since non-conference play began when they host Wichita…

Former East Carolina women’s basketball great Rosie Thompson was one of 15 individuals chosen earlier this week to be inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame as part of the 2023 class.

There was a moment. A glimmer of a chance, and the way things had been going for Tommy Paul these last two weeks in Melbourne, he and his growing number of fans had reason to expect that moment might explode into a longer-lasting reality.

Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in as a justice of the Supreme Court more than four years ago, on Oct. 6, 2018. His oath followed perhaps the ugliest Supreme Court Senate confirmation process in history — and that, given the previous examples of Robert Bork and Clarence Thomas, is saying something…

North Carolina faces many challenges. You and I may disagree with how to rank those challenges, or what to do about them, but we share a belief that our state could be in a better place than it is today.

Rep. George Santos (R-N.Y.) quickly became a global punchline when his multiple, contradictory misrepresentations of his background were revealed after he was elected in November. But there’s nothing funny about Speaker Kevin McCarthy’s refusal to call on Santos to resign, as a few other Rep…

In late 2011, John Oliver and his “Daily Show” cameraman made a trek to my office, then in Providence, Rhode Island, to take me to task. I had recently referred to the Tea Partiers who had pushed America to the brink of a disastrous default as “economic terrorists.”

When the talk turns to left-wing “woke” ideology on college campuses, I sometimes say I was there at the creation. I basically resigned my first academic job over it. Clearly it was quit or get fired — basically for having the wrong perceived identity and a congenital resistance to moralistic cant.

Uncle Rich appreciated time. He would especially appreciate a completed time cycle. He collected stopwatches, he wrote music and he was a systems manager with IBM. In leisure and in business, these are the utensils of modern Eastern Standard time.

Q I had just started a new job when the pandemic happened. On top of the lockdowns and home-schooling our kids, I was diagnosed with IBS. My husband read there’s research that it’s caused by stress, and that makes a lot of sense to me. Can you please talk about that research?

State AP Stories

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As mass shootings are again drawing public attention, states across the U.S. seem to be deepening their political divide on gun policies. A series of recent mass shootings in California come after a third straight year in which U.S. states recorded more than 600 mass shootings involving at least four deaths or injuries. Democratic-led states that already have restrictive gun laws have responded to home-state tragedies by enacting or proposing even more limits on guns. Many states with Republican-led legislatures appear unlikely to adopt any new gun policies after last year's local mass shootings. They're pinning the problem on violent individuals, not their weapons.

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The families of five passengers killed in a plane crash off the North Carolina coast have settled wrongful death lawsuits for $15 million. Their attorneys told the court the companies that owned the plane and employed the pilot paid the money. The suits claimed the pilot failed to properly fly the single-engine plane in weather conditions with limited visibility. All eight people aboard died off the Outer Banks. The passengers included four teenagers and two adults, returning from a hunting trip. The founder of the company that owned the plane was killed, and his family wasn't involved in the lawsuits.

A man who caused evacuations and an hourslong standoff with police on Capitol Hill when he claimed he had a bomb in his pickup truck outside the Library of Congress has pleaded guilty to a charge of threatening to use an explosive. Floyd Ray Roseberry, of Grover, North Carolina, pleaded guilty to the felony charge in Washington federal court. He faces up to 10 years behind bars and is scheduled to be sentenced in June. An email seeking comment was sent to his attorney on Friday. Roseberry drove a black pickup truck onto the sidewalk outside the Library of Congress in August 2021 and began shouting to people in the street that he had a bomb.

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North Carolina Democrats have introduced legislation to codify abortion protections into state law as Republicans are discussing early prospects for further restrictions. Their legislation, filed Wednesday in both chambers, would prohibit the state from imposing barriers that might restrict a patient’s ability to choose whether to terminate a pregnancy before fetal viability, which typically falls between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Current state law bans nearly all abortions after 20 weeks, with narrow exceptions for urgent medical emergencies that do not include rape or incest. House Speaker Tim Moore told reporters he didn’t expect the Democrats’ bill to get considered.

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Supporters of abortion rights have filed separate lawsuits challenging abortion pill restrictions in North Carolina and West Virginia. The lawsuits were filed Wednesday. They are the opening salvo in what’s expected to a be a protracted legal battle over access to the medications. The lawsuits argue that state limits on the drugs run afoul of the federal authority of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The agency has approved the abortion pill as a safe and effective method for ending pregnancy. More than half of U.S. abortions are now done with pills rather than surgery.

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A lawyer representing the leaders of North Carolina’s state employee health plan has defended its exclusion of gender affirming treatments before a federal appeals court. State Treasurer Dale Folwell and the State Health Plan’s executive administrator are seeking to overturn a trial court order demanding that the plan pay for “medically necessary services,” including hormone therapy and some surgeries, for transgender employees and their children. Attorney John Knepper told a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday that the plan routinely excludes some medically necessary procedures based on cost, but does not make any of those determinations based on sex or gender.

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The University of Wisconsin System has joined a number of universities across the country in banning the popular social media app TikTok on school devicies. UW System officials made the announcement Tuesday. A number of other universities have banned TikTok in recent weeks, including Auburn, Arkansas State and Oklahoma. Nearly half the states have banned the app on state-owned devices, including Wisconsin, North Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana and South Dakota. Congress also recently banned TikTok from most U.S. government-issued devices over bipartisan concerns about security. TikTok is owned by ByteDance, a Chinese company that moved its headquarters to Singapore in 2020. Critics say the Chinese government could access user data.

North Carolina’s elected state auditor has apologized for leaving the scene of a Raleigh accident last month after she drove her state-issued vehicle into a parked car. Monday's statement by Democratic Auditor Beth Wood is her first comment about charges against her that were made public last week. Wood called her decision “a serious mistake” and says she will continue serving as auditor. Wood was first elected to the job in 2008. Raleigh police cited Wood for a misdemeanor hit-and-run and another traffic-related charge. Her court date is later this week. Wood says the collision happened after she left a holiday gathering Dec. 8.

National & World AP Stories

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Iran’s Defense Ministry says one of its factories was attacked by drones in the central city of Isfahan. A statement carried by the state-run IRNA news agency says the attack occurred late Saturday and caused minor damage to a rooftop. Iran and Israel have long been engaged in a shadow war that has included covert attacks on Iranian military and nuclear facilities. Israel did not acknowledge carrying out the assault. Meanwhile, state media also reported a fire at an oil refinery near the northern Iranian city of Tabriz, saying one person was injured. It blamed the fire on “wear and tear.” A 5.9 magnitude earthquake also struck nearby, killing three people and injuring over 800 others.

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Israel has sealed the home of an Palestinian man who killed seven people outside an east Jerusalem synagogue in a preliminary step ahead of its expected demolition. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Cabinet also approved an order to seal the home of a second Palestinian shooter — a 13-year-old boy who wounded two Israeli men in east Jerusalem on Saturday. His Cabinet also took steps toward approving other punitive measures against the families of Palestinian attackers, including potentially stripping them of citizenship rights and deporting them. The steps came as two Palestinian men died from wounds sustained in fighting with Israeli. The moves by Israel further raised tensions as U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken landed in the region.

Elon Musk’s enigmatic personality and unconventional tactics are emerging as key exhibits in a trial revolving around one of his most polarizing pursuits — tweeting. The trial, centered on a pair of tweets announcing Musk had obtained the money to take Tesla private in 2018, reeled the 51-year-old billionaire into a courtroom for three days of testimony that opened a peephole into his often inscrutable mind. Evidence submitted so far in a trial scheduled to end this week has shown Musk had made a proposal to lead a buyout, but that he hadn't locked up the money to pay for it as he tweeted in 2018.

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Police video of the deadly beating of Tyre Nichols by officers in Memphis, Tennessee, is hard to watch. The images are a glaring reminder of repeated failures of efforts to prevent police brutality. Nearly 32 years ago, the savage beating of Rodney King by police in Los Angeles sparked calls for reform. Such brutal scenes have repeated themselves, with police killing roughly three people per day since 2020. The Memphis officers were fired and face murder charges, and their so-called Scorpion unit has been disbanded by the police chief. But advocates say nothing less than a cultural change in law enforcement will provide the safety and liberty Black people demand.

Friends and volunteers have gathered at Kyiv’s St Sophia’s Cathedral to say goodbye to a New Zealand scientist who was killed in Ukraine with another volunteer while they were trying to evacuate people from a front-line town. Andrew Bagshaw, a dual New Zealand-British citizen, was 48 years old, and British citizen Briton Parry, who was 28, went missing earlier this month while heading to the town of Soledar, in eastern Ukraine's Donetsk region. Also Sunday, Russian forces heavily shelled the city of Kherson. Regional officials said three people were killed and nine were wounded. Russia’s Foreign Ministry accused Ukraine and its allies of war crimes in the shelling of two hospitals in occupied parts of Ukraine.

Advocates for highway construction are concerned their projects are getting shortchanged in the competition for grant money under the new infrastructure law. The Department of Transportation is expected to formally announce the law's first Mega Grants this week. The initial batch, which was shared with Congress, includes some highway projects, as well as money for bridges and mass transit. But some applicants have a beef with what they say is the Biden administration's clear preference for projects that repair roads rather than build or expand them. One of the projects that failed to make the cut seeks to widen a notoriously congested stretch of interstate highway on the route between Arizona's two largest cities.

“Your education. Your way. Be original. Be you.” That’s how New College of Florida describes its approach to higher education in an admission brochure. The state school of fewer than 1,000 students nestled along Sarasota Bay has long been known for its progressive thought and creative course offerings that don’t use traditional grades. To some, New College’s reputation as a haven for originality and individualized coursework is now threatened. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis’ recently appointed six new trustees who intend to turn the school into a classical liberal arts school modeled after conservative favorite Hillsdale College in Michigan.

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Access has improved across the U.S. to a rescue drug that reverses opioid overdoses, but advocates say naloxone — commonly known by its brand name Narcan — still isn't getting to everyone who needs it. A small group of volunteers run an organization that appears to be the largest distributor of naloxone in Albany, Georgia. But many communities lack similar structures. Public health experts are telling U.S. state and local government officials in charge of using funds from opioid settlements to consider getting more naloxone into the hands of people who use drugs and those who are around them. In some places, it goes mostly to first responders.