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East Carolina University School of Music will host the 25th annual ECU Summer Guitar Festival this week. The event, scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, is returning after a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19.

Legion bingo: American Legion Post 39’s weekly bingo is on Wednesdays at 403 St. Andrews Drive off of Greenville Boulevard. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games start at 6:30 p.m.

The following new corporations in Pitt and neighboring counties filed May 23-27 with the N.C. Secretary of State’s office:


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East Carolina baseball coach Cliff Godwin routinely said that his team was playing with house money as the Pirates entered the postseason. After all, it took some time for the Pirates to match the preseason Top-15 hype.

Adam Ulffers played his high school lacrosse at J.H. Rose and is set to take his play to the next level at Randolph College after signing his National Letter of Intent this past spring.

As I always imagined it, the ascension of the first Black woman to the U.S. Supreme Court would signal an era of progress, a time of triumph for Americans who believe in the beloved community of which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. I was well off the mark. This is no era of progress, no t…

Did our leaders even bother to think through all of the potential unintended consequences of picking a fight with Russia over Ukraine? And before anyone says that this is strictly between Ukraine and Russia, the New York Times dispelled that notion, pointing out that the CIA is on the ground…

Greenville is a thriving community in so many ways, yet we lack a centralized, physical gathering space for our LGBT community. What residents may not realize is that, eight years ago, the LGBT Greenville Facebook group came to life to meet that need.

BTH of the person saying rivers never go in reverse. Actually tidal rivers like the Tar do indeed run both ways.

East Carolina University School of Music will host the 25th annual ECU Summer Guitar Festival this week. The event, scheduled for Thursday through Sunday, is returning after a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19.

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State AP Stories

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Tropical Storm Colin has brought rain and winds to parts of North and South Carolina, though the storm has weakened and conditions are expected to improve by Monday's July Fourth celebrations. Separately, the center of Tropical Storm Bonnie rolled into the Pacific on Saturday after a rapid march across Central America, where it caused flooding, downed trees and forced thousands of people to evacuate in Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Forecasters say Bonnie is likely to become a hurricane by Monday off the southern coast of Mexico, but it is unlikely to make a direct hit on land.

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general has not yet indicated whether he will ask a court to lift the injunction on a state law banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Attorney General Josh Stein told Republican lawmakers on Friday that his department’s attorneys are reviewing the litigation that led a federal court to strike down the 20-week ban. His letter responds to GOP demands that he take immediate action in the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion protections. Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore warned last week Stein's inaction would lead them to get involved.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear a case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures and blocking state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday threw out the 2020 conspiracy and bribery convictions of a major political donor in North Carolina and his associate, declaring that the trial judge erred in his jury instructions.

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Republican legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled state budget adjustments for the coming year, proposing to spend or set aside billions in expected extra tax collections to raise worker pay, recruit companies, build more infrastructure and combat inflation.

National & World AP Stories

Asian shares are mostly lower after tepid trading on Wall Street amid worries about a global recession. Benchmarks fell in afternoon trading. Oil prices recouped some lost ground. Analysts said markets are focused on a variety of risks, including inflation, oil prices, moves by the U.S. Federal Reserve and other central banks on interest rates, political developments in Britain and worries about COVID-19. But the basic mood appeared to be wait-and-see. Japan has parliamentary elections this weekend, but the expected outcome is for more stability, with Prime Minister Fumio Kishida headed to victory. Indexes ended with meager gains on Wall Street.

Despite a massive government crackdown on protests of the invasion of Ukraine, some Russians persist in speaking out against the invasion. One woman in the Ural Mountains city of Perm posts signs in the entrance to her apartment block bearing anti-war sayings. But it remains dangerous. Authorities rubber-stamped legislation that outlawed the spread of “false information” about the invasion and disparaging the military. They have used it against anyone who spoke out publicly against the attack or talked about the atrocities Russian troops were committing in Ukraine. One Moscow printer who made posters saying “No to war” has switched to blander messages such as “Fear is not an excuse to do nothing.”

An Egyptian government push to remove the string of houseboats that dot Cairo’s Nile River banks has seen their numbers dwindle from several dozen to just a handful. Houseboats are a Cairo tradition that dates back to the 1800s. Government efforts to remove them have drawn criticism in Egypt, where residents are mourning the loss of not just their homes but a way of life. Critics say the move is part of a series of development decisions by the government of Abdel Fattah el-Sissi that endanger the city’s heritage. The houseboats are being removed or renovated to develop the waterfront commercially, according to officials. But the government has not released detailed plans of what that entails.

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Parts of Australia’s largest city have been inundated by four major floods since March last year, leaving weary victims questioning how many times they can rebuild. The latest disaster follows Sydney’s wettest-ever start to a year with dams overflowing and a sodden landscape incapable of absorbing more rain that must instead run into swollen waterways. There are climate, geographic and demographic factors behind the scale of Sydney’s latest flooding emergency.

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The man accused of opening fire at an Independence Day parade in suburban Chicago legally bought five weapons, including two high-powered rifles. Authorities said Tuesday that the purchases were allowed even though police were called to his home twice in 2019 for threats of violence and suicide. The suspect was charged with seven counts of murder. Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart promised that dozens more charges would be sought and that the man could receive a mandatory life sentence without the possibility of parole. The assailant sprayed more than 70 rounds from a rooftop into a crowd in Highland Park, an affluent community of about 30,000 on the Lake Michigan shore.

Immigrant advocates are hoping a federal appeals court will uphold an Obama-era program that prevents the deportation of thousands of immigrants brought into the United States as children. A federal judge in Texas last year declared the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program illegal — although he agreed to leave the program intact for those already benefitting from it while his order is appealed. Three judges on the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans were set to hear arguments Wednesday. And supporters of the program planned a vigil outside the courthouse.

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Evacuation orders have been expanded for remote communities near a wildfire that's chewing through California forests. The Sierra Nevada Gold Country fire tripled in size to about 6.1 square miles Tuesday. The fire erupted on the Fourth of July at a recreation area packed with people. Between 85 to 100 celebrating at a river were forced to take shelter at a Pacific Gas & Electric Co. facility. Amador County Sheriff Gary Redman says they were safely evacuated. Evacuations are in place for parts of Amador and Calaveras counties. Redman suggested fireworks or a barbeque as a possible fire cause.

  • Updated

Asian shares are mostly lower after tepid trading on Wall Street amid worries about a global recession. Major benchmarks fell across Asia in early trading. Oil prices recouped some lost ground after plunging on Monday. Analysts said markets are focused on a variety of risks, including inflation, oil prices, moves by the U.S. Federal Reserve and other central banks on interest rates, political developments in Britain and worries about COVID-19. But the basic mood appeared to be wait-and-see. Japan has parliamentary elections this weekend, but the expected outcome is for more stability, with Prime Minister Fumio Kishida headed to victory. Indexes ended with meager gains on Wall Street.