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Swamp Stomp: Wildwood Park, 3450 Blue Heron Drive, will host Swamp Stomp from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturday. The event will include a chance for participants to catch frogs and salamanders and use microscopes to view some macro-invertebrates. Cost is $5 for city residents and $7 for others. Participation is limited, and preregistration is required. Call 329-4576.


Local Events

Senator Joe Manchin has been Congress’ largest recipient of money from natural gas pipeline companies. He just reciprocated by gaining Senate support for the Mountain Valley pipeline in West Virginia and expedited approval for pipelines nationwide. Senator Kyrsten Sinema is among Congress’s …

When the House of Representatives passed landmark climate legislation on Friday, President Joe Biden chalked up one of the surprise successes of his presidency. Only last month his ambitious agenda appeared sunk after a conservative Democrat and coal baron, Joe Manchin, refused to back it. H…

After most Republicans vociferously condemned the FBI’s raid on Donald Trump’s Florida estate, Fox News host Steve Doocy plaintively asked his guest, GOP Congressman Steve Scalise: “What ever happened to the Republican Party backing the blue?”

Beginning in the months before Donald Trump took office, and extending well into his presidency, the media and political world took a set of vague but serious accusations of wrongdoing involving the 2016 Trump campaign and Russia and created a 24/7 frenzy of talk about secret evidence, poten…

Q I haven’t interviewed in decades. I’m not kidding. I’ve been at the same company for over 20 years, but a friend of a friend reached out and wants to talk to me about a new job they would create just for me! How can I practice?

Capsules of movies playing locally. New releases are indicated with an asterisk.

Out and About lists current events sponsored by nonprofit groups and churches in Martin County. Please send listings to The Enterprise, 106 West Main St., Williamston, NC 27892 or email bchoggard@apgenc.com events must be submitted by 4 p.m. each Tuesday.

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State AP Stories

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North Carolina’s Supreme Court opened the door Friday to nullifying a voter ID mandate approved by citizens in 2018. The court's 4-3 majority said lawmakers who put it on the ballot were elected from districts tainted by illegal racial bias. But since nullifying a voter approved amendment is a serious move, it wants a trial judge to gather more evidence first. It's a victory for the state NAACP, which said it shows that “rigging elections by trampling on the rights of Black voters has consequences.” Republican state House Speaker Tim Moore calls it “blatant judicial activism.”

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Bank of America says the revenue it gets from overdrafts has dropped 90% from a year ago, after the bank reduced overdraft fees to $10 from $35 and eliminated fees for bounced checks. The nation’s largest banks are moving away from the practice of charging exorbitant fees on what are mostly small-dollar purchases after years of public pressure. Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that he expects whatever residual income the bank earns from overdraft fees will come from small businesses using overdraft fees as a convenience.  .

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Texas has executed a man who fatally stabbed a suburban Dallas real estate agent more than 16 years ago. Kosoul Chanthakoummane was given a lethal injection Wednesday at the state penitentiary in Huntsville. He was condemned for fatally stabbing 40-year-old Sarah Walker in July 2006. She was found stabbed more than 30 times in a model home in McKinney, about 30 miles north of Dallas. Prosecutors say the 41-year-old beat and stabbed Walker before stealing her Rolex watch and a silver ring. The U.S. Supreme Court had declined to delay Chanthakoummane’s execution over claims by his attorneys that challenged the DNA evidence in his case. Chanthakoummane was the second inmate executed in Texas in 2022.

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A federal judge has ruled that abortions are no longer legal after 20 weeks of pregnancy in North Carolina. U.S. District Judge William Osteen reinstated the abortion ban Wednesday after he said the June U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade erased the legal foundation for his 2019 ruling that placed an injunction on the 1973 state law. The ruling erodes protections in one of the South’s few remaining safe havens for reproductive freedom. His decision defies the recommendations of all named parties in the 2019 case, including doctors, district attorneys and the attorney general’s office, who earlier this week filed briefs requesting he let the injunction stand.

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The CEO of Bank of America said the recent debate over whether the U.S. economy is technically in a recession or not is missing the point. What matters is that current economic conditions are negatively impacting those who are most vulnerable. Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that higher gas prices and rising rents are of particular concern when he looks at the health of the U.S. consumer. While gas prices have come down a bit recently, rents are still going up. But overall, the BofA CEO said he believes the American consumer is in good shape and able to withstand the economic turbulence.

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A $100,000 reward is being offered in the case of a North Carolina sheriff’s deputy found fatally shot along a dark stretch of road last week. “Horrified” by a string of shootings that have injured and killed several deputies in the state in recent weeks, on Monday the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association announced the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the killing of Wake County Sheriff’s Deputy Ned Byrd. Authorities say they're trying to learn why Byrd stopped there. The sheriff's office says there’s still an active investigation that now includes the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

North Carolina’s state of emergency for COVID-19 is officially ending more than two years after Gov. Roy Cooper issued his first order. Cooper signed an executive order Monday terminating the emergency at the end of the day. He already announced last month it would end now because the state budget law contained health care provisions that would allow his administration to keep responding robustly to the virus. Cooper's initial order was signed on March 10, 2020. Republican legislators complained about his powers under the orders. A 2021 law will give the Council of State and the General Assembly more say-so about long-term emergencies.

National & World AP Stories

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For the Mapuche, Chile’s largest Indigenous group and more than 10 percent of its population, a pristine river like the Truful Truful, flowing from a lava field under an Andean volcano, is the home of a spiritual force to revere, not a natural resource to exploit. That has led many Mapuche communities by the Truful Truful, the Pilmaiquen River and across the country’s water-rich south to fight hydroelectric plants that they see as desecrating nature and depriving Indigenous communities of essential energies that keep them from getting sick. But as Chile readies to vote on a new constitution highlighting Indigenous rights, spirituality and ideology get entangled.

For the Mapuche, Chile’s largest Indigenous group and more than 10 percent of its population, a pristine river like the Truful Truful, flowing from a lava field under an Andean volcano, is the home of a spiritual force to revere, not a natural resource to exploit. That has led many Mapuche communities by the Truful Truful, the Pilmaiquen River and across the country’s water-rich south to fight hydroelectric plants that they see as desecrating nature and depriving Indigenous communities of essential energies that keep them from getting sick. But as Chile readies to vote on a new constitution highlighting Indigenous rights, spirituality and ideology get entangled.

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Prosecutors in Mexico say they have arrested a former attorney general and issued warrants for 83 army soldiers and officers, police and gang members in the 2014 disappearance of 43 students. Prosecutors announced changes Friday against Jesús Murillo abuses in the investigations of the mass abduction. Similar charges were lodged against 20 soldiers and officers. Murillo Karam was attorney general from 2012 to 2015 under then President Enrique Peña Nieto. Murillo Karam announced in 2014 that the students had been killed and burned at a garbage dump by a drug gang. But the investigation allegedly used torture, improper arrest and mishandling of evidence, allowing most of the suspects to walk free.

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Nicaraguan police have raided the residence of a Roman Catholic bishop, detaining him and several other people holed up inside for two weeks. Friday's pre-dawn raid came after Nicaraguan authorities accused Matagalpa Diocese Bishop Rolando Álvarez of allegedly “organizing violent groups” and inciting them “to carry out acts of hate against the population.” President Daniel Ortega’s government has moved systematically against voices of dissent. Dozens of political opposition leaders were arrested last year, including seven potential candidates to challenge him for the presidency. He has also increasingly clashed with the Catholic church, Nicaragua's predominant religion and the main independent institution.

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A woman who says she was sexually abused hundreds of times by R. Kelly before she turned 18 has testified that she agonized several years ago about whether to cooperate with federal investigators who were looking into child abuse allegations involving the singer. The woman, who is now 37 and going by the pseudonym “Jane” at Kelly's Chicago trial, told the court Friday that she ultimately did cooperate with the investigation because she didn't want to “carry his lies.” During cross-examination, she conceded that she lied at one point when she told federal agents that she wasn’t sure if Kelly had abused minors other than her. She said she lied because she didn’t want to get others in trouble.

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A large fire at a Massachusetts marina has destroyed several boats, buildings and vehicles. Aerial video taken by WCVB-TV on Friday showed much of the boatyard in Mattapoisett engulfed in flames. The fire generated a plume of black smoke so thick it was picked up by weather radar. Tim Price, a mechanic at the boatyard, told WJAR-TV that a vessel caught fire in one of the sheds, and the fire spread quickly. He said he knew of one person who was injured, but did not elaborate. The cause of blaze is under investigation. Fire and police officials said no one was available to comment.

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A fire at a munitions depot inside Russia forced the evacuation of two villages near the border with Ukraine, while two civilians were reported wounded by Russian shelling near the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant as both sides traded accusations about fighting near the facility in southern Ukraine. The fire late Thursday struck the munitions storage building near the village of Timonovo in Russia’s Belgorod region on Ukraine’s northeastern border. About 1,100 people live in Timonovo and Soloti, about 15 miles (25 kilometers) from the border. No one was hurt, said Belgorod regional Gov. Vyacheslav Gladkov on Friday.