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More than 3,000 more students are anticipated to move into East Carolina University’s residence halls this week as the fall semester approaches, prompting traffic delays and an uptick in the university’s police presence in the area of 14th Street in Greenville.

FFA Mum Sale: Greene Central FFA members are taking orders for garden mums for pick-up or deliveries beginning Sept 15. Mums are available in yellow, burgundy, purple, bronze and white. Eight-inch pots are $5, 10-inch pots are $10, and 14-inch pots are $20. To have a student contact you, or to place an order, call the school at 747-3814, or email henrypasour@greene.k12.nc.us. Greenhouse hours for other plant sales are 8-12 on school days.

Bethel workforce development: Pitt Community College, Pitt NCWorks Career Center and Pitt County DSS are partnering with the Bethel Workforce Development Center, 7449 N. Main St., to provide Bethel residents with resource assistance and educational, training and employment opportunities from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursdays. Call 818-0020.


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Over the last seven days, the Little League World Series has been filled with tightly contested games, so it was only fitting Monday afternoon’s championship game between Maryland and Texas would bring more of the same.

A great big BYH to the Pitt County Animal Services staff and dedicated volunteers for gaining statewide recognition for the innovative and successful “Mutt Strutters” program. This is a shining example of the great things we can accomplish in the community when we work together for a greater…

The Health and Human Services Department recently made news with a report touting that “National Uninsured Rate Reaches All-Time Low in Early 2022.” Sounds encouraging, but look beneath the covers and what you find is a quiet but enormous shift from private to government-subsidized coverage.

Out and About lists current events sponsored by nonprofit groups and churches in Martin County. Please send listings to The Enterprise, 106 West Main St., Williamston, NC 27892 or email bchoggard@apgenc.com events must be submitted by 4 p.m. each Tuesday.

Leftover steak is an unlikely star of this hearty main course salad. Cold meats can be a welcome addition to many salads — especially in the summer, when you crave a fresh salad and a substantial meal at once. It also solves how to use up any leftover meat from a previous evening’s barbecue …

The CDC has relaxed its COVID restrictions however Pitt County last week was deemed to have a high transmission rate. The positivity rate was 29 percent. CDC says it still recommends wearing masks indoors when rate is high. Continue to eat healthy to support your immune system.

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State AP Stories

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Bank of America says the revenue it gets from overdrafts has dropped 90% from a year ago, after the bank reduced overdraft fees to $10 from $35 and eliminated fees for bounced checks. The nation’s largest banks are moving away from the practice of charging exorbitant fees on what are mostly small-dollar purchases after years of public pressure. Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that he expects whatever residual income the bank earns from overdraft fees will come from small businesses using overdraft fees as a convenience.  .

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Texas has executed a man who fatally stabbed a suburban Dallas real estate agent more than 16 years ago. Kosoul Chanthakoummane was given a lethal injection Wednesday at the state penitentiary in Huntsville. He was condemned for fatally stabbing 40-year-old Sarah Walker in July 2006. She was found stabbed more than 30 times in a model home in McKinney, about 30 miles north of Dallas. Prosecutors say the 41-year-old beat and stabbed Walker before stealing her Rolex watch and a silver ring. The U.S. Supreme Court had declined to delay Chanthakoummane’s execution over claims by his attorneys that challenged the DNA evidence in his case. Chanthakoummane was the second inmate executed in Texas in 2022.

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A federal judge has ruled that abortions are no longer legal after 20 weeks of pregnancy in North Carolina. U.S. District Judge William Osteen reinstated the abortion ban Wednesday after he said the June U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade erased the legal foundation for his 2019 ruling that placed an injunction on the 1973 state law. The ruling erodes protections in one of the South’s few remaining safe havens for reproductive freedom. His decision defies the recommendations of all named parties in the 2019 case, including doctors, district attorneys and the attorney general’s office, who earlier this week filed briefs requesting he let the injunction stand.

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The CEO of Bank of America said the recent debate over whether the U.S. economy is technically in a recession or not is missing the point. What matters is that current economic conditions are negatively impacting those who are most vulnerable. Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that higher gas prices and rising rents are of particular concern when he looks at the health of the U.S. consumer. While gas prices have come down a bit recently, rents are still going up. But overall, the BofA CEO said he believes the American consumer is in good shape and able to withstand the economic turbulence.

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A $100,000 reward is being offered in the case of a North Carolina sheriff’s deputy found fatally shot along a dark stretch of road last week. “Horrified” by a string of shootings that have injured and killed several deputies in the state in recent weeks, on Monday the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association announced the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the killing of Wake County Sheriff’s Deputy Ned Byrd. Authorities say they're trying to learn why Byrd stopped there. The sheriff's office says there’s still an active investigation that now includes the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

North Carolina’s state of emergency for COVID-19 is officially ending more than two years after Gov. Roy Cooper issued his first order. Cooper signed an executive order Monday terminating the emergency at the end of the day. He already announced last month it would end now because the state budget law contained health care provisions that would allow his administration to keep responding robustly to the virus. Cooper's initial order was signed on March 10, 2020. Republican legislators complained about his powers under the orders. A 2021 law will give the Council of State and the General Assembly more say-so about long-term emergencies.

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ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — The “Wellness District” is a place where customer service means taking care of the customer from the inside out. The North Asheville neighborhood is flush with businesses promoting healthy lifestyles all within walking distance of each other.

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Police in eastern North Carolina say two customers at a two fast-food restaurant died when a vehicle crashed into the building. It happened Sunday morning at a Hardee's in Wilson, which is about 40 miles east of Raleigh. The sport utility vehicle struck 58-year-old Christopher Ruffin and 62-year-old Clay Ruffin, both of Wilson. One died at the scene, while the other died at a Greenville hospital. Police identified the driver as 78-year-old Jesse Lawrence of Wilson. He was treated at a hospital and released. Police say they don't believe the crash to be medical- or impairment-related, and no charges had been announced late Sunday afternoon.

National & World AP Stories

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has met the U.N. chief and Turkey’s leader in Ukraine. Little progress was reported on expanding Ukraine’s grain exports, the volatile situation at a Russian-occupied nuclear power plant and efforts to help end the war. It was Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's first visit to Ukraine since the outbreak of the war, and the second by U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres. The leaders also discussed exchanges of prisoners of war and a proposed U.N. fact-finding mission to a prison in Russian-occupied Ukraine where 53 POWs were killed last month.

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A woman who has been central to R. Kelly’s legal troubles for more than two decades has testified that the R&B singer sexually abused her “hundreds” of times before she turned 18 years old, starting when she was just 15. Jane — the pseudonym for the 37-year-old woman at Kelly’s trial on child pornography and obstruction of justice charges — told jurors Thursday that in the late 1990s when she was 13, she asked Kelly to be her godfather because she saw him as an inspiration and mentor. She said within weeks, Kelly would call her and say sexual things. She said he first touched her touched her breasts when she was 14 and that they first had sex when she was 15.

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A federal judge has ordered the Justice Department to put forward proposed redactions as he committed to making public at least part of the affidavit supporting the search warrant for former President Donald Trump’s estate in Florida. U.S. Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart on Thursday gave prosecutors a week to submit a copy of the affidavit with proposed redactions for the information it wants to keep secret. It comes a little more than a week after the FBI seized classified and top secret information during a search at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate last week. A prosecutor said the investigation into whether Trump illegally stored classified records is still “in its early stages.”

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A top executive at former President Donald Trump’s family business has pleaded guilty to evading taxes. The deal could potentially make him a star witness against the company at a trial this fall. Longtime Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg admitted at a court hearing Thursday that he dodged taxes on lavish fringe benefits he got from the company. Weisselberg, who was removed from the CFO role after his arrest last year, is the only person to face criminal charges so far in the Manhattan district attorney’s long-running investigation of the company’s business practices. It is accused of helping some employees avoid income taxes by failing to report their full compensation. Trump is not charged in the case.

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Russian fans of Starbucks coffee shops are getting the chance to see if a homegrown successor can measure up. After the U.S. company left Russia in the wake of Russia's military operation in Ukraine, entrepreneurs who bought the assets are opening shops in former Starbucks locations this week. They have the nearly identical name of Stars Coffee and a logo almost indistinguishable from its predecessor's. The venture follows the strategy of reviving closed McDonald's outlets under a new name but with fundamentally the same menu. Russian entrepreneurs saw opportunity in suddenly unoccupied stores after Western companies exited the country.

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Stocks wavered on Wall Street in another round of choppy trading that has mostly held back major indexes following a weekslong run of gains. The S&P 500 rose 0.1% in afternoon trading Thursday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell and the Nasdaq rose. Technology companies gained ground. Cisco Systems rose after turning in stronger-than-expected quarterly results. Energy companies also gained ground along with rising crude oil prices. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.88%. The U.S. government reported that slightly fewer Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the labor market remains strong.

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CNN says it has canceled its weekly program on the media, ‘Reliable Sources,’ and host Brian Stelter will be leaving the network. The show, which predated Stelter's arrival from The New York Times, will have its last telecast on Sunday. Under new president Chris Licht, CNN has been looking to cut costs but also to put a less opinionated product on the air. Stelter has written a book on Fox News Channel and been critical of that network on the air. The “Reliable Sources” newsletter that summed up each day's media news will continue. Stelter said that he was grateful for his nine years at CNN, proud of the show and thankful to its viewers.

The head of the U.N. refugee agency says Europe’s embrace of millions of Ukrainians who fled Russia’s invasion has shown that it’s possible to welcome large numbers of asylum-seekers, and the approach should be replicated to receive those fleeing other nations. In an interview with The Associated Press, U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi described the European Union’s response as “exemplary.” He noted that nearly 4 million Ukrainians have registered with the bloc’s temporary protection system. That stands in contrast to EU efforts in recent years to keep migrants from Africa and the Middle East from reaching its shores. Some European leaders have sought to differentiate between the plight of Ukrainians and that of others. Grandi called that distinction “racist.”