Skip to main content

Greenville Christmas: The City of Greenville and Uptown Greenville will host Greenville Gives from 4:30-7:30 p.m. today at Five Points Plaza, Evans and Fifth streets. The Greenville Jaycees Christmas Parade will begin at 5 p.m. on Saturday on Evans Street from First to 10th streets. Visit www.greenville-jaycees.com/christmasparade and greenvillenc.gov.

Local Events

BYH, if a monkey hoarded more bananas than it could eat, scientists would study that monkey to see what was wrong with it. If a human does it, they put him on the cover of Forbes magazine.

Unlike other federal judges, the justices on the Supreme Court are subject to no code of conduct. It is time for the court, led by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., to set ethics standards for itself that are transparent, consistent and actually work. At stake is no less than its legitimacy…

I love being in the presence of smart, articulate and visionary folks, even on a rainy, unseasonably cool mid-November evening. A large crowd gathered at Wait Chapel on the campus of Wake Forest University for their acclaimed Face-to-Face lecture series. The featured speaker was noted author…

Nonsense about people struggling due to high inflation. Go by one of those trendy coffee places and see people standing in line to pay $5 for a cup of coffee. I didn’t even spend that much on my wife’s diamond ring.

Winter hasn’t even started yet, but it sure looks like it in my backyard. Practically all of the leaves are fallen, and we’ve had two hard frosts here in central South Carolina. I am grateful that in my part of the world, the winters are relatively mild and snow is a rare event.

In August 2014 I visited Paris, France. I embarked on a solo afternoon with a short list of to-dos. One, I had to visit the Eiffel Tower. Two, I had to eat crepes filled with cookie butter spread at a food stand and, three, I had to go to a French patisserie to buy and eat macarons.

A recent study showed that physical activity is a simple, cost-effective way of enhancing vaccine effectiveness to lessen the risk of severe COVID-19 illness requiring hospital admission. Don’t let the holidays keep you from exercizing and eating healthy.

When it comes to a dessert, a baked upside-down anything is a winner — even when it’s a mistake. A tarte Tatin is a classic French upside-down fruit tart, traditionally made with apples. It’s named for the Tatin sisters, who created the upside-down caramelized tart, purportedly by accident, …

Support local journalism

Now, more than ever, the world needs trustworthy reporting—but good journalism isn’t free. Please support us by making a contribution.

State AP Stories

  • Updated

Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. They've been wiped out in 11 of the 41 states where they were reported in 2014 or 2015. And there are fewer in parts of the other 30. But in spite of more than $100 million in federal money, officials estimate there are still 6 million to 9 million hogs gone wild nationwide and in three U.S. territories, doing at least $2.5 billion a year in U.S. damages. Estimates in 2014 were 5 million hogs and $1.5 billion in damages. Experts say the bigger figures are due to better estimates, not increases.

  • Updated

Police in Raleigh, North Carolina, have released body camera video from a shootout with a 15-year-old boy suspected of fatally shooting five people and wounding two more. Police spent several hours searching for the armed suspect after the rampage seven weeks ago. The teen was ultimately found in a shed behind a residential property. The newly released video images show officers surrounding the structure. Multiple shots ring out from the building, and officers return fire. The video also shows Raleigh Police Officer Casey Clark being shot in the right knee and then dragged to safety behind another building.

  • Updated

Since the recovery of sunken treasure began decades ago from an 1857 shipwreck off the coast of South Carolina, tens of millions of dollars worth of gold has been sold. But scientists, historians and collectors say that the real fortunes will begin to hit the auction block on Saturday in Reno. For the first time, hundreds of Gold Rush-era artifacts entombed in the S.S. Central America, known as the “Ship of Gold,” will go on public sale. A few of the items from the pre-Civil War steamship, which sank in a hurricane on its way from Panama to New York City, could fetch as much as $1 million.

North Carolina government is appealing a judge’s order that demands by certain dates many more community services for people with intellectual and development disabilities who otherwise live at institutions. Health and Human Services Secretary Kody Kinsley announced the formal challenge on Wednesday. He says his agency has grave concerns about some directives issued four weeks ago by Judge Allen Baddour. One in particular says new admissions to new admissions for people with such disabilities in state-run development centers, privately intermediate care facilities and certain adult care homes must end by January 2028. Kinsley says the decision could shutter small facilities and leave clients without accommodations.

  • Updated

Incoming and returning Republicans to the North Carolina Senate have chosen a key lawmaker on tax, voting and energy issues to become majority leader for the next two years. The Senate Republican Caucus on Monday elected Sen. Paul Newton of Cabarrus County to the post. Newton succeeds Sen. Kathy Harrington, who didn't seek reelection this fall to her Gaston County seat. The caucus also agreed to nominate Phil Berger to a seventh term as president pro tempore when the session convenes in January. He has held the job since 2011. Senate Democrats meeting separately Monday reelected Sen. Dan Blue of Wake County as minority leader.

  • Updated

A memorial service will be held this weekend for Betty Ray McCain. She was a longtime North Carolina Democratic Party activist and counselor to former four-time Gov. Jim Hunt who died last week at age 91. McCain was the first woman to chair the state Democratic Party in the 1970s. Hunt named McCain secretary of the Department of Cultural Resources in 1993. She also served multiple terms on the University of North Carolina Board of Governors and on many boards and commissions. Current Gov. Roy Cooper called McCain a “trailblazer for women and a powerful force for good in the arts, education and public service."

  • Updated

Democrats celebrated winning North Carolina's lone toss-up race for the U.S. House this month as Wiley Nickel won the 13th District seat. The victory creates a 7-7 split in the state’s delegation — the best showing for Democrats in a decade. But there’s a good chance Nickel’s district and others will be altered for the 2024 elections, returning the advantage to Republicans. The current lines are only being used for these elections. New lines will be drawn by Republicans, who still control the General Assembly. And a new GOP majority on the state Supreme Court likely will be more skeptical of legal challenges that scuttled previous boundaries.

CHERRYVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A Cherryville woman’s first birthday party ever at age 105 turned out just perfect. Line dancers and square dancers performed routines to entertain her, 12-year-old Lily brought her 10-week-old yellow Labrador named Nina for her to pet and she even got the chance to …

National & World AP Stories

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union tentatively agreed to a $60-per-barrel price cap on Russian oil, a key step as Western sanctions aim to reorder the global oil market to prevent price spikes and starve President Vladimir Putin of funding for his war in Ukraine.

  • Updated

Glowing lava from the world’s largest volcano is a sight to behold, but for many Native Hawaiians, Mauna Loa’s eruption is a time to pray, make offerings and honor both the natural and spiritual worlds. An eruption of a volcano like Mauna Loa has a deep yet very personal cultural significance for many Native Hawaiians. It can be an opportunity to feel a connection with creation itself through the way lava gives birth to new land, as well as a time to reflect on their own place in the world and the people who came before them.

Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper and his real estate company are being scrutinized in a criminal investigation. The probe is examining whether they misused any public money in their failed effort to build a new practice facility for the NFL team. The York County Sheriff’s Office says state agents and local prosecutors are involved in the probe, which does not mean any crime occured. Tepper’s company GT Real Estate is denying any criminal wrongdoing. It suggests the probe could be timed to disrupt a settlement the team reached agreeing to repay York County more than $21 million, roughly what it took in sales tax revenue to build access roads.

Asia’s richest man, coal magnate Gautam Adani, made his vast fortune betting on coal as an energy hungry India grew swiftly after its economy was liberalized in the 1990s. Adani says he wants to be known as the world’s largest renewable energy player by 2030, but he’s also investing heavily in petrochemicals and conventional power. Adani has profited mightily since Narendra Modi, India’s most influential prime minister in decades, took office in 2014. With a net worth around $125 billion, the tycoon has diversified into construction, data transmission, media, renewable energy, defense manufacturing and agriculture -- industries aligned with the government’s strategic priorities.

  • Updated

Worries about inflation are hitting Wall Street, and the S&P 500 is down 0.8% in morning trading. It's on track to erase much of what had been a healthy week of gains after a report showed wages for U.S. workers are accelerating. That's good news for workers, but it can also feed into even higher inflation for the nation. It's also raising worries the Federal Reserve may not be able to ease back as much as hoped on its big interest-rate hikes. Treasury yields jumped following the release of the jobs report, which also showed stronger hiring by U.S. employers than expected.

  • Updated

Eight years into a U.S. program to control damage from feral pigs, the invasive animals are still a multibillion-dollar plague on farmers, wildlife and the environment. They've been wiped out in 11 of the 41 states where they were reported in 2014 or 2015. And there are fewer in parts of the other 30. But in spite of more than $100 million in federal money, officials estimate there are still 6 million to 9 million hogs gone wild nationwide and in three U.S. territories, doing at least $2.5 billion a year in U.S. damages. Estimates in 2014 were 5 million hogs and $1.5 billion in damages. Experts say the bigger figures are due to better estimates, not increases.