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Harvest Festival: Home Place Strawberries & More, 3055 Chinquapin Road, Farmville, will hold its annual Harvest Festival from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. The event will feature vendors, a food truck, hayrides, barrel rides, farm animals, a corn maze, homemade ice cream, pumpkins, mums and more.

A new boat builder that had been operating without a permit in Greenville for a year has now been granted the air quality license from the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Division of Air Quality, the division announced Thursday


Local Events

FARMVILLE — After surrendering an opening-drive score, Farmville Central scored 39 unanswered points on its way to a 46-14 Homecoming victory over visiting Ayden-Grifton in an Eastern Plains 2A Conference football game Friday night.

BYH to those who complain about fast, reckless, DUI and other problem drivers when there is a simple solution. Get rid of the ones who sentence convicted offenders to a slap on the wrist. They could sentence them to community service like picking up litter, time in jail, a healthy fine (mone…

BOH. Here's something we all can agree upon, even Nancy Pelosi and Mitch O'Connell: Donald Trump was exceptionally competent at firing people. Didn't he hire everyone he fired, except for FBI Director Comey? Apparently, he was a poor judge of potential, qualifications and loyalty.

She looked at me with an interesting smile, so I smiled back at her. I didn’t say anything, though, because I was in the middle of a song. I had been asked, along with some other musicians, to play at a “music in the streets” type of event in Washington, so a lot of people passed by. But, sh…

The South Ayden High School Class of 1967 celebrated their 55th year reunion during Labor Day weekend at The Rock Springs Center in Greenville with a senior prom. Three former South Ayden High School teachers were honored during this reunion gala on Sept. 2.

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State AP Stories

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Leaders of College Park Baptist Church in Greensboro, North Carolina, thought it was odd when the Southern Baptist Convention recently sent queries about the congregation's LGBTQ-affirming ministry. The church itself had voted to leave the conservative denomination 23 years ago. But it was still on the SBC rolls until last week. That's when the convention's Executive Committee voted to cut ties because of the congregation's “affirmation ... of homosexual behavior.” The Rev. Michael Usey of College Park said the congregation was ousted for the right reason. Said Usey, “It’s good when people reject you because they understand clearly who you are."

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Experts say the U.S. Supreme Court’s June ruling overturning Roe v. Wade appears to be sending more teens to their doctors in search of birth control, including long-acting reversible forms like intrauterine devices and implants. Waits for appointments are growing in some areas, Planned Parenthood is getting a flood of questions and doctors report demand even among teens who aren’t sexually active. Some patients are especially fearful because some of the new abortion laws don’t include exceptions for sexual assault. Dr. Peggy Stager said dedicated spots for insertion of the Nexplanon implant are consistently filled at her Ohio practice and requests for contraceptive refills have increased 30% to 40% since the Court's June ruling.

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Four people have pleaded guilty to misdemeanors for their roles in absentee ballot fraud in rural North Carolina during the 2016 and 2018 elections. These convictions Monday stemmed from an investigation that in part resulted in a do-over congressional election. The defendants were associated with Leslie McCrae Dowless, a political operative in Bladen County whom authorities called the ringleader of the ballot scheme. Dowless died this year before his case went to trial. The State Board of Elections has ordered a new election for the 2018 9th Congressional District because of all the fraud allegations. Cases against six other defendants are pending.

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Forty years after a predominantly Black community in Warren County, North Carolina, rallied against hosting a hazardous waste landfill, President Joe Biden’s top environment official has returned to what is widely considered the birthplace of the environmental justice movement to unveil a national office that will distribute $3 billion in block grants to underserved communities burdened by pollution. Joined by civil rights leaders and participants from the 1982 protests, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan announced Saturday that he is dedicating a new senior level of leadership to the environmental justice movement they ignited. The new Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights will merge three existing EPA programs.

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North Carolina Republican Senate candidate Ted Budd is leaning into his support for abortion restrictions and his allegiance to former President Donald Trump as Democrats fight for an elusive victory in the Southern swing state. Democratic optimism remains tempered given the state’s recent red tilt. But Democratic officials believe Budd's candidacy gives them a real chance at flipping a Senate seat — and the balance of power in Washington — this fall. Budd appeared alongside Trump at a rally in Wilmington Friday night, where the former president praised the candidate as “a conservative, America First all-star in Congress” and urged his supporters to turn out to vote.

National & World AP Stories

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Hurricane Ian has ben lashing western Cuba with rain and winds as it swirls north toward the Florida coast. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Ian hit Cuba early Tuesday as a Category 3 storm with sustained winds of 125 mph. Authorities in Cuba evacuated more than 50,000 people and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis says an estimated 2.5 million people are under evacuation orders. Florida is already getting heavy rain from Ian, which is expected to intensify into a catastrophic Category 4 hurricane before its most damaging winds hit the peninsula on Wednesday.

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A series of unusual leaks on two natural gas pipelines running from Russia under the Baltic Sea to Germany have triggered concerns about sabotage. The leaks overshadowed the inauguration Tuesday of a long-awaited pipeline that will bring Norwegian gas to Poland. Sweden’s national seismic network said it recorded two explosions that occurred Monday near the leaks in the Russian gas pipelines. The Polish prime minister called the events “an act of sabotage,” while his Danish counterpart said she couldn't rule it out after three leaks were detected on Nord Stream 1 and 2. The pipelines aren't bringing gas to Europe amid an energy standoff with Russia but are still filled with gas.

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Stocks rose on Wall Street a day after a broad sell-off sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average into a bear market, joining other major U.S. indexes. The Dow was up 0.8% in morning trading Tuesday. The S&P 500 also rose, along with the tech-heavy Nasdaq. Energy stocks gained ground along with rising oil prices and Treasury yields were mixed. With just a few days left in September, stocks are heading for another losing month as markets fear that the higher interest rates being used to fight inflation could knock the economy into a recession.

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MOSCOW (AP) — More than a dozen people wounded in a school shooting in central Russia will be taken to Moscow for further treatment, authorities said Tuesday, a day after a gunman killed 17 people and wounded 24 others.

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Leaders of College Park Baptist Church in Greensboro, North Carolina, thought it was odd when the Southern Baptist Convention recently sent queries about the congregation's LGBTQ-affirming ministry. The church itself had voted to leave the conservative denomination 23 years ago. But it was still on the SBC rolls until last week. That's when the convention's Executive Committee voted to cut ties because of the congregation's “affirmation ... of homosexual behavior.” The Rev. Michael Usey of College Park said the congregation was ousted for the right reason. Said Usey, “It’s good when people reject you because they understand clearly who you are."

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Officials say about 98,000 Russians have crossed into Kazakhstan in the week since President Vladimir Putin announced a partial mobilization of reservists to fight in Ukraine. Kazakhstan and Georgia, both once part of the Soviet Union, appeared to be the most popular destinations for those traveling by land. Russia’s Defense Ministry has said that only about 300,000 people with prior combat or other military service would be called up, but reports have emerged from various Russian regions that recruiters were rounding up men outside that description. That fueled fears of a much broader call-up, sending droves of men of all ages and backgrounds to airports and border crossings.

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Voting has concluded in referendums that are expected to serve as a pretext for Moscow to annex Russian-held regions of Ukraine. Moscow-backed officials in the four occupied regions said polls closed Tuesday afternoon after five days of voting and the counting of ballots had started. The preordained outcome of the Kremlin-orchestrated votes has heightened tension between Russia and the West. The annexation of Ukraine's Kherson, Zaporizhzhia, Luhansk and Donetsk could happen as soon as Friday and sets the stage for a dangerous new phase of the war in Ukraine. The Kremlin's spokesman said the changed status of the regions would bring "all the corresponding consequences for protection of those areas and ensuring their security.”

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There's a little-known practice in the U.S. known as “gooning.” Brawny men show up under the cover of darkness and force a teenager into a vehicle, taking them against their will to a boarding school, foster home or treatment center. The process is typically initiated by parents at their wit’s ends over a child they perceive as troubled. For the kids, it’s the traumatic first leg of a journey to placements that can be hundreds of miles from home. Teens who resist might be handcuffed or blindfolded. One secure transport operator was indicted last month, but criminal charges are rare because the industry is virtually unregulated.