910 area code transitions

The 910 area code is transitioning to 10-digit dialing due to the consolidation of statewide voice services to a centralized platform. This means callers must dial the area code and number for the call to successfully reach the intended recipient.

In North Carolina, the 910 area code is one of 82 area codes in 35 states that will be transitioning to 10-digit dialing due to the consolidation of statewide voice services to a centralized platform.

When an area code transitions to ten-digit dialing, callers are no longer be able to dial seven digits to make a local call. Callers MUST dial the area code and number for the call to successfully reach the intended recipient.

Some phone providers have already implemented 10-digit dialing while others are phasing in 10-digit dialing between now and July 15.

According to the Federal Communications Commission, after that date, local calls dialed with only seven digits may not be completed, and a recording will inform the caller that the call cannot be completed as dialed.

This transition is necessary because in America there are more phones than people, and each phone needs its own number.

According to the FCC, in the early 1990s in order to accommodate the growing need for more phone numbers, some areas began to add a second area code for local calls.

Dialing both the area code and the seven-digit number was necessary to ensure the call reached the intended recipient.

As more area codes begin to run out of new seven-digit numbers to assign, a second local area code may be added, requiring that area to transition to 10-digit dialing.

If you currently use a PBX or VoIP phone system, you may need to update or reprogram it for 10-digit dialing.

Because of these recent changes, all calls to NC judicial offices and court staff, made from a landline will need to use 10-digit dialing.

For more details on 10-digit dialing, visit fcc.gov/consumers/guides/ten-digit-dialing.

Ena Sellers may be reached at esellers@ncweeklies.com